Technology & Innovation 17(1-2) Abstracts

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Technology and Innovation, Vol. 17, pp. 1-3
1929-8241/15 $90.00
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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/194982415X14349917064711
E-ISSN 1949-825X
Copyright ©
2015 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved

Introduction: Perspective on Water

Vimal Chaitanya* and Frederic Zenhausern

*NMSU Research, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM, USA
†College of Medicine–Phoenix, University of Arizona, Phoenix, AZ, USA

As the global population expands, climate change, overexploitation of water resources, pollution, and economic growth are impacting the availability of water. As a result, society faces an unprecedented challenge to advance science and develop appropriate technological innovations to ensure water security, which is inextricably tied to food and energy security. This issue of Technology and Innovation contains a special section that reports on innovative solutions to these concerns, including new practices in water conservation and the use of new biodegradable materials that could significantly reduce the environmental impact of aqueous food packaging waste.

Key words: Water; Water security; Conservation; Environmental impact; Water quality

Accepted April 2, 2015.
Address correspondence to Frederic Zenhausern, Ph.D., MBA, Professor, Basic Medical Sciences, Director, Center for Applied Nanobioscience and Medicine, College of Medicine–Phoenix, Arizona Biomedical Research Collaborative, Building ABC1, 425 N. Fifth Street, Phoenix, AZ 85004-2157, USA. Tel: +1-602-827-2051; Fax: +1-602-827-9115; E-mail:  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Technology and Innovation, Vol. 17, pp. 5-19
1929-8241/15 $90.00
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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/194982415X14349917064757
E-ISSN 1949-825X
Copyright ©
2015 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved

It’s Going to Take More Innovation Than Technology to Increase Water Conservation Practices

Liz Felter,* Tracy Irani,† Paul Monaghan,‡ Hannah Carter,‡ and Michael Dukes§

*IFAS Extension, University of Florida, Orlando, FL, USA
†Family, Youth & Community Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA
‡Agricultural Education & Communications, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA
§Agricultural & Biological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA

The purpose of the study was to examine the perceptions of homeowners in Orange County, Florida, who have automated irrigation systems concerning community-based social marketing (CBSM) strategies, especially use of norms that could be employed to reduce water used for lawn care, to understand what influenced homeowners to increase water conservation behaviors. The study also looked at the pragmatic approach and the effectiveness of CBSM to bring about behavior change. Emerging themes revealed pressure from the homeowners’ association (HOA) to have perfect grass, lack of knowledge about proper lawn care, confusion over when to water per week, and the inability to use the irrigation timer correctly. Participants indicated that the most significant norm was to abide by the water restrictions and have a nice lawn. The responses also indicated that following water restrictions was their primary means of conservation. The recommendation was made for practitioners to use CBSM to create a program for HOA board members to reduce water usage and eliminate wasteful practices.

Key words: Water conservation; Norms; Barriers; Qualitative; Community-based social marketing (CBSM); Focus groups

Accepted April 2, 2015.
Address correspondence to Liz Felter, IFAS Extension, University of Florida, 6021 S. Conway Rd., Orlando, FL 32812, USA. Tel: +1 (407) 254-9200; Fax: +1 (407) 850-5125; E-mail:  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Technology and Innovation, Vol. 17, pp. 21-35
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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/194982415X14349917064793
E-ISSN 1949-825X
Copyright ©
2015 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved

Biodegradable Foams and Edible Films: From Purified Protein s to Aqueous Feedstocks of Designed Polypeptides

Donald T. Haynie

Nanomedicine and Nanobiotechnology Laboratory, Department of Physics, School of Natural Sciences and Mathematics, College of Arts and Sciences, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, USA

Protein foams and emulsions play key roles in foods, glues, and many other products. Edible films made of proteins, especially two major soybean globulins, are of interest in numerous application areas, notably, biodegradable food packaging. Food-related allergies affect as many as 15 million persons in the US alone, and concern is growing over preventable aspects of the negative impact of manufacturing and food processing on the environment. This article describes general aspects of the noted topics and reviews recent results. It is hypothesized that significant advances in the production, structure and function, and safety of food foams and edible films can be realized by replacing proteins with designed polypeptides in aqueous feedstock. Finally, comments are made on the commercialization prospects for designed polypeptide materials technology.

Key words: Manufacturing; Materials; Peptide; Polymer; Protein; Water

Accepted April 2, 2015.
Address corresponding to Donald T. Haynie, College of Arts and Sciences, University of South Florida, 4202 E. Fowler Avenue, CMC 114, Tampa, FL 33620, USA. Tel: +1 (813) 974.7793; Fax: +1 (813) 974.5813; E-mail:  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Technology and Innovation, Vol. 17, pp. 37-39
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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/194982415X14349917064838
E-ISSN 1949-825X
Copyright ©
2015 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved

Commentary: Patent Prosecution Highway—Fast Track Examination of Applications

Daniel Hunter

Office of International Patent Cooperation, United States Patent and Trademark Office, Alexandria, VA, USA

An exploding backlog of unprosecuted patent applications among the world’s intellectual property offices in the late 1990s led to a search for ways to improve patent prosecution efficiency. One of the results was focusing on work sharing, which helps to reduce duplication of efforts when a patent application is filed in multiple countries. Work sharing allows patent examiners in one office to leverage the work already performed in another office. The Patent Prosecution Highway is a system that facilitates such work sharing between intellectual property offices.

Key words: Patents; Harmonization; Patent prosecution highway; Intellectual property; United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO)

Accepted May 21, 2015.
Address correspondence to Daniel Hunter, U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, 600 Dulany Street, Alexandria, VA 22314, USA. E-mail:  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it



Technology and Innovation, Vol. 17, pp. 41-48
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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/194982415X14349917064874
E-ISSN 1949-825X
Copyright ©
2015 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved

Traits and Roles of Jonas Kamlet, Pioneering Chemistry Consultant, as a Guide to Contemporary Inventors

Dean F. Martin and Autumn S. Thompson

Department of Chemistry, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, USA

As state universities feel economic pinches of reduced support from state legislatures, and as sources of federal funding for supported research projects face additional challenges, other sources of support need to be found. Two sources under consideration are royalties and licensing fees for successful patents. A good example of a successful developer of patents was Jonas Kamlet, Ph.D. (1914–1960), who was an early consultant in chemical and other matters and was the successful co-owner, with his wife Edna, of the Kamlet Laboratories. The roles that he played in his career can, we believe, provide good examples for contemporary researchers in doing applied research and obtaining fees for consulting and related professional activities. We review here some of the pertinent roles in the life of Dr. Jonas Kamlet, which may serve as a guide for contemporary innovators.

Key words: Kamlet; Roles; Consulting; Chemicals; Procurement, Synthesis

Accepted April 2, 2015.
Address correspondence to Dean F. Martin, Ph.D., Distinguished University Professor Emeritus, Department of Chemistry-CHE 205, University of South Florida, 4202 East Fowler Avenue, Tampa, FL 33620, USA. Tel: +1-813-974-2374; Fax: +1-813-974-3203; Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Technology and Innovation, Vol. 17, pp. 49-59
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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/194982415X14349917064919
E-ISSN 1949-825X
Copyright ©
2015 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved

A General Survey of Telesurgical Advances in Otolaryngology

Alisha R. Bonaroti* and K. Paul Boyev

*College of Medicine, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, USA
†Department of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, USA

Telesurgery is a division of telemedicine that involves distances ranging from several feet to many miles between the surgeon and patient. This technique is facilitated by devices such as the da Vinci® Surgical System, which allows the surgeon to manipulate instruments at a console while viewing high-resolution imaging of the patient. The surgeon’s motions are then translated into precise movements of robotic instruments. Otolaryngology–head and neck surgery is uniquely positioned to exploit significant advancements in telesurgery. This article aims to assess the latest innovations in each of the seven subspecialties of otolaryngology: head and neck oncology, laryngology, facial plastic surgery, otology/neurotology, rhinology, and pediatric otolaryngology. At the present, telesurgery has promising applications for the future, but there are several challenges to implementation including design, cost, and legal issues.

Key words: Telesurgery; Telemedicine; da Vinci
® Surgical System; Robotic surgery; Otolaryngology

Accepted April 2, 2015.
Address correspondence to Dr. K. Paul BoyevMorsani College of Medicine, University of South Florida, 12901 Bruce B. Downs Blvd. MDC 73, Tampa, FL 33612, USA. Tel: +1 (813) 974-4683; Fax: +1 (813) 974-7586; E-mail:  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Technology and Innovation, Vol. 17, pp. 61-73
1929-8241/15 $90.00
+ .00
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/194982415X14349917064955
E-ISSN 1949-825X
Copyright ©
2015 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved

Scientific Ethics: Emphasizing Regulatory Science Requirements

A. Alan Moghissi,*†§ Nikita A. Gurudas,*† Shiqian Pei,*† Dennis K. McBride,*†‡ and Michael S. Swetnam*

*Potomac Institute for Policy Studies, Arlington, VA, USA
†School of Medicine, Georgetown University, Washington, DC, USA
‡National Defense University, Washington, DC, USA
§Institute for Regulatory Science, Alexandria VA, USA

This article attempts to provide ethical requirements derived from best available science concept (BAS) and metrics for evaluation of scientific claims (MESC) derived from BAS. The article reviews the historical events leading to the development of ethical requirements for the medical profession. It uses the example of the Tuskegee experiments to demonstrate the lack of ethics in performing human experiments. It briefly describes the Nuremberg trials and ethical codes developed during those trials. Subsequently, medical and other professional ethics are reviewed to indicate the current status of various professions. Another ethical problem briefly addressed in this article deals with personal, including professional, ethics as compared to legal and other requirements. A brief description of BAS principles is followed by identification of MESC pillars. The article describes several ethical principles derived from BAS principles, notably the transparency principle and reproducibility principle. Similarly, the article describes ethical principles derived from the standardization of science pillar addressing the level of maturity of science and the pillar dealing with areas outside the purview of science.

Key words: Ethical principles; Nuremberg trials; Tuskegee experiments

Accepted April 2, 2015.
Address correspondence to A. Alan Moghissi, Ph.D., President, Institute for Regulatory Science, P. O. Box 7166, Alexandria, VA 22307, USA. Tel: +1-703-765-3546; Fax: +1-703-765-3143; E-mail:  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it