Cell Medicine 7(3) Abstracts

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Cell Medicine, Vol. 7, pp. 95–108, 2015
2155-1790/15 $90.00
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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/215517914X680038
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2015 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
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Immature Dental Pulp Stem Cells Showed Renotropic and Pericyte-Like Properties in Acute Renal Failure in Rats

Michele A. Barros,*†1 Joao Flavio Panattoni Martins,‡1 Durvanei Augusto Maria,§ Crisitiane Valverde Wenceslau,* Dener Madeiro De Souza,* Alexandre Kerkis,* Niels Olsen S. Camara,¶ Julio Cesar C.Balieiro,# and Irina Kerkis*

*Laboratory of Genetics, Butantan Institute, Sao Paulo, SP, Brazil
†School of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science, University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP, Brazil
‡Department of Histology and Embryology, Pontifical Catholic University of Campinas, Campinas, Brazil
§Laboratory of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Butantan Institute, Sao Paulo, SP, Brazil
¶Department of Immunology, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil
#Department of Basic Science of Faculty of Animal Science and Food Engineering, University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil

Acute renal failure (ARF) is a common renal disease that can lead to high mortality. Recovery from ARF occurs with the replacement of necrotic tubular cells by functional tubular epithelial cells and the normalization of microvascular endothelial cell function in the peritubular capillaries. Conventional therapeutic techniques are often ineffective against ARF. Hence, stem cell therapies, which act through multiple trophic and regenerative mechanisms, are encouraging. We investigated the homing of human immature dental pulp stem cells (IDPSCs) after endovenous (EV) or intraperitoneal (IP) injection, in immunocompetent Wistar rats with ARF induced by intramuscular injection of glycerol, without the use of immunosuppression. The cells, which had been cryopreserved for 6 years, were CD105+, CD73+, CD44+, and partly, STRO-1+
and CD146+, and presented unaltered mesoderm differentiation potential. The presence of these cells in the tubular region of the kidney and in the peritubular capillaries was demonstrated. These cells accelerate tubular epithelial cell regeneration through significant increase of Ki-67-immunoreactive cells in damaged kidney. Flow cytometry analysis confirmed that IDPSCs home to the kidneys (EV 34.10% and IP 33.25%); a lower percentage of cells was found in the liver (EV 19.05% and IP 9.10%), in the muscles (EV 6.30% and IP 1.35%), and in the lungs (EV 2.0% and IP 1.85%). After infusion into rat, these cells express pericyte markers, such as CD146+, STRO-1+, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF+). We found that IDPSCs demonstrate renotropic and pericyte-like properties and contributed to restore renal tubule structure in an experimental rat ARF model.

Key words: Rat; Acute tubular necrosis; Homing; Human immature dental pulp stem cells

Received August 16, 2013; final acceptance February 20, 2014. Online prepub date: March 24, 2014.
1These authors provided equal contribution to this work.
Address correspondence to Dr. Irina KerkisLaboratorio de GeneticaInstituto Butantan, Av. Vital Brasil 1500, SP, CEP 05503-900. Tel: +5511 26279705; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Cell Medicine, Vol. 7, pp. 109–121, 2015
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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/215517914X681794
Copyright ©
2015 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
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A Rotating Bioreactor for Scalable Culture and Differentiation of Respiratory Epithelium

Micha Sam Brickman Raredon,* Mahboobe Ghaedi,* Elizabeth A. Calle,* and Laura E. Niklason*†

*Department of Biomedical Engineering, Yale University, New Haven, CT, USA
†Department of Anesthesia, Yale University, New Haven, CT, USA

Respiratory epithelium is difficult to grow in vitro, as it requires a well-maintained polarizing air–liquid interface (ALI) to maintain differentiation. Traditional methods rely on permeable membrane culture inserts, which are difficult to work with and are ill-suited for the production of large numbers of cells, such as the quantities required for cell-based clinical therapies. Herein, we investigate an alternative form of culture in which the cells are placed on a porous substrate that is continuously rolled, such that the monolayer of cells is alternately submerged in media or apically exposed to air. Our prototype bioreactor is reliable for up to 21 days of continuous culture and is designed for scale-up for large-scale cell culture with continuous medium and gas exchange. Normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells were cultured on an absorbent substrate in the reactor for periods of 7, 14, and 21 days and were compared to static controls that were submerged in media. Quantification by immunohistochemistry and quantitative PCR of markers specific to differentiated respiratory epithelium indicated increased cilia, mucous production, and tight junction formation in the rolled cultures, compared to static. Together with scanning electron microscopy and paraffin histology, the data indicate that the intermittent ALI provided by the rolling bioreactor promotes a polarized epithelial phenotype over a period of 21 days.

Key words: Lung; Respiratory epithelium; Bioreactor; Air–liquid interface (ALI); Tissue engineering

Received July 22, 2013; final acceptance October 13, 2014. Online prepub date: December 12, 2014.
Address correspondence to Laura E. Niklason, Yale University, 10 Amistad Rm. 301D, New Haven, CT 06519, USA. Tel: +1-203-737-1422; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Cell Medicine, Vol. 7, pp. 123–131, 2015
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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/215517915X688057
Copyright ©
2015 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
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A Combination of Low-Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound and Nanohydroxyapatite Concordantly Enhances Osteogenesis of Adipose-Derived Stem Cells From Buccal Fat Pad

Rika Nagasaki, Yoshiki MukudaiYasumasa Yoshizawa, Masahiro Nagasaki, Sunao Shiogama, Maiko Suzuki, Seiji Kondo, Satoru Shintani, and Tatsuo Shirota

Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, School of Dentistry, Showa University, Tokyo, Japan

The osteogenic induction of adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) has been regarded as an important step in bone tissue engineering. In the present study, we focused on the buccal fat pad (BFP) as a source of adipose tissue, since BFPs are encapsulated by adipose tissue and are often coextirpated during oral surgery. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) is effective in the treatment of fractures, and nanohydroxyapatite (NHA) is known as a bone substitute material. Here we investigated the synergistic effects of LIPUS and NHA in the osteogenesis of ADSCs. A combination of LIPUS irritation and NHA as a scaffold significantly increased the osteogenic differentiation of ADSCs in vitro, and in our in vivo study in which ADSCs were transplanted into calvarialbone defects of nude mice, the combinational effect greatly enhanced the new bone formation of the margin of the defects. These results demonstrate that synergistic effects of LIPUS and NHA are capable of effectively inducing the differentiation of ADSCs into osteoblasts, and they suggest a novel therapeutic strategy for bone regeneration by the autotransplantation of ADSCs.

Key words: Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS); Nanohydroxyapatite (NHA); Adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs); Bone regeneration; Osteoblast

Received February 12, 2014; final acceptance April 14, 2015. Online prepub date: April 22, 2015.
Address correspondence to Yoshiki Mukudai, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, School of Dentistry, Showa University, 2-1-1 Kitasenzoku, Ota-ku, Tokyo 145-8515, Japan. Tel: +81-3-3787-1151; Fax: +81-3-5498-1543; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Cell Medicine, Vol. 7, pp. 133–142, 2015
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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/215517915X688606
Copyright ©
2015 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved

Review

Disease and Stem Cell-Based Analysis of the 2014 ASNTR Meeting

David J. Eve

Center of Excellence for Aging and Brain Repair, Department of Neurosurgery and Brain Repair, University of South Florida Morsani College of Medicine, Tampa, FL, USA

A wide variety of subjects are presented at the annual American Society of Neural Therapy and Repair meeting every year, as typified by this summary of the 2014 meeting. Parkinson’s disease-related presentations were again the most popular topic, with traumatic brain injury, spinal cord injury, and stroke being close behind. Other disorders included Huntington’s disease, brain cancer, and bipolar disorders. Several studies were related to multiple diseases, and many studies attempted to reveal more about the disease process. The use of scaffolds, drugs, and gene therapy as disease models and/or potential therapies were also featured. An increasing proportion of presentations related to stem cells, with the study of multiple stem cell types being the most common. Induced pluripotent stem cells were increasingly popular, including two presentations each on a muscle-derived dedifferentiated cell type and cells derived from bipolar patients. Other stem cells, including neural stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells, umbilical cord blood cells, and embryonic stem cells, were featured. More than 55% of the stem cell studies involved transplantation, with human-derived cells being the most frequently transplanted, while rats were the most common recipient. Two human autologous studies for spinal cord injury and hypoxia-derived encephalopathy, while a further three allogenic studies for stroke and spinal cord injury, were also featured. This year’s meeting highlights the increasing promise of stem cells and other therapies for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders.

Key words: Regenerative medicine; Neurodegenerative diseases; Stem cell therapies; Combinational studies/therapies

Received June 29, 2015; final acceptance July 7, 2015. Online prepub date: July 8, 2015.
Address correspondence to David J. Eve, Center of Excellence for Aging and Brain Repair, Department of Neurosurgery and Brain Repair, University of South Florida Morsani College of Medicine, 12901 Bruce B. Downs, Blvd., Tampa, FL, USA. Tel: +1 813 974 6169; Fax: +1 813 974 3078; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it