Tourism Analysis 20(5) Abstracts

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Tourism Analysis, Vol. 20, pp. 457–467
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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/108354215X
14265319207434
E-ISSN 1943-3999
Copyright ©
2015 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
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Methodological Bricolage: A Journey on the Road Less Traveled in Tourism Studies

Michael O’Regan

Faculty of Management, Bournemouth University, Poole, Dorset, UK

This article, by exploring an approach to research, argues a case for bricolage as an acceptable approach in tourism research. Tourism researchers thinking about utilizing methodological bricolage as a research approach have little scholarly literature to draw from; therefore, it remains relatively underused and misunderstood as a means of qualitative inquiry. This article presents an account of getting to grips with a multiparadigmatic methodological bricolage as a way of understanding the world of backpacking and its inhabitants, who actively constitute, distinguish, and label themselves as backpackers. It is an approach that delivered a coherent conceptual scaffold, producing a rich, but always partial, understanding of a social world, those who inhabit it, and how they sustain it. It doing so, the research design adds to methodological innovation and diversification in tourism research.

Key words: Bricolage; Research design; Backpacking; Tourism; Mobilities

Address correspondence to Michael O’Regan, Ph.D., Senior Academic, Faculty of Management, Bournemouth University, Dorset House, Talbot Campus, Fern Barrow, Poole, Dorset, BH12 5BB, UK. Tel: +44 01202 965852; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Analysis, Vol. 20, pp. 469–474
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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/108354215X
14400815386687
E-ISSN 1943-3999
Copyright ©
2015 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
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Workplace Substance Use and Acceptance Among Nightclub Employees: A Qualitative Investigation

Miranda Kitterlin-Lynch,* Catherine Curtis,† and Ashely Cervera*

*Chaplin School of Hospitality & Tourism Management, Florida International University, North Miami, FL, USA
†School of Hotel and Restaurant Administration, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK, USA

Most investigations of substance use in nightclubs are from a club goers’ perspective. Consequently, that leaves an understudied population—the nightclub employee. Therefore, the purpose of this exploratory qualitative study investigated substance use at work by nightclub employees and the conditions of acceptable workplace consumption. This study selected a nonprobability purposive sample consisting of seven semistructured, in-depth interviews with nightclub employees from Miami, Florida. Findings revealed that all of the employees participated in workplace substance use, and found it acceptable to engage in substance use at work under the following conditions: the selection of substance (stimulant preference or alcohol) and quantity (low to moderate dosage). The environment and availability of substances in the nightclub normalized workplace substance use. Employees felt that management had a substantial influence in the acceptance of workplace substance use because managers would either ignore or outright encourage the intake of substances on the job.

Key words: Workplace substance use; Nightclubs; Workplace norms

Address correspondence to Miranda Kitterlin-Lynch, Ph.D., Chaplin School of Hospitality & Tourism Management, Florida International University 3000 NE 151st Street, Biscayne Bay Campus, HM 210, North Miami, FL 33181, USA. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Analysis, Vol. 20, pp. 475–485
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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/108354215X
14411980111299
E-ISSN 1943-3999
Copyright ©
2015 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
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Customization Bridges the Gap Between Tourist Knowledge and Satisfaction

Wen-Hwa Lee,* Jo-Hui Lin,† Shu-Ju Lee,‡ Ching Yeh,§ and Fang-I Lee‡

*Department of Food and Beverage Management, Taipei College of Maritime Technology, Taipei, Taiwan
†Graduate Institute of Recreation, Tourism, and Hospitality Management, National Chiayi University, Chiayi, Taiwan
‡Business Administration Department, Ming Chuan University, Taipei, Taiwan
§Taiwan Railways Administration, Taipei, Taiwan

Tourism is one of the major service industries today, one that faces increasing consumer demand for customized products and services, of which FIT is a commercially important representative. Tourists desire overseas tourism products that they can design or arrange themselves instead of purchasing existing package tours. The literature pays scant attention to the relationships among tourist knowledge, customization, and satisfaction from the consumer perspective. This study shows that tourist knowledge positively influences customization and customization affects satisfaction. This result also appears that customization presents a mediating effect. Finally, comprehensive management implications for tourism managers are discussed.

Keywords: Customization; Tourist Knowledge; Satisfaction; Fit

Address correspondence to Wen-Hwa Lee, Department of Food and Beverage Management, Taipei College of Maritime Technology, 212, Sec. 9, Yangping North Road, Taipei 111, Taiwan. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Analysis, Vol. 20, pp. 487–497
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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/108354215X
14411980111334
E-ISSN 1943-3999
Copyright ©
2015 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
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Are Travel Purchases More Satisfactory Than Nontravel Experiential Purchases and Material Purchases? An Exploratory Study

Galia Fuchs,* Po-Ju Chen,† and Abraham Pizam

*Department of Hotel and Tourism Management, The Guilford Glazer Faculty of Business and Management, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, Israel
†Rosen College of Hospitality Management, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL, USA

Satisfaction derived from purchases can affect one’s happiness and quality of life. Previous studies illustrated that this effect is not equal across purchase categories. Specifically, experiential purchases were found to bring more satisfaction and happiness to consumers than material purchases. However, these comparison studies treated a variety of experiential purchases as one homogeneous category regardless of their nature of consumption. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to bridge this gap and to assess the difference in the level of satisfaction among the three purchase categories: material, travel (composite event experiential purchases), and nontravel experiential purchases (single event experiential purchases). Moreover, this study attempted to ascertain the consistency of these differences across several purchases of each category. By analyzing the satisfaction derived from past actual purchases of 282 participants it was found that respondents were more satisfied with past travel purchases than both pastnontravel experiential purchases, and past material purchases. In addition, this study found differences between US and Israeli samples regarding purchase satisfaction derived from the three categories. Lastly, this study also discovered that the price paid for purchases in each of the three categories did not have an effect on the derived satisfaction.

Key words: Experiential purchases; Material purchases; Travel purchases; Satisfaction with purchases

Address correspondence to Galia Fuchs, Ph.D., Department of Hotel and Tourism Management, The Guilford Glazer Faculty of Business and Management, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva 84105, Israel. Tel: (972) 54-6275125; Fax: (972)-8-6472920; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Analysis, Vol. 20, pp. 499–510
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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/108354215X
14411980111370
E-ISSN 1943-3999
Copyright ©
2015 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
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Effects of Destination Image and Total Perceived Value on Tourists’ Behavioral Intentions: An Investigation of Domestic Festival Tourists

Mehmet Oğuzhan İlban,* Mehmet Kaşli,† and Muammer Bezirgan*

*The School of Applied Sciences, The University of BalıkesirBurhaniye, Turkey
†Tourism and Hotel Management Department, The University of Eskisehir OsmangaziEskişehir, Turkey

The aim of this study is to identify the relationship between the destination image perceived by domestic festival tourists visiting Burhaniye and their perceived values (PV) and behavioral intentions (BI). A research model was created to determine the relationships between variables in an equation model. The research findings showed that destination image (DI) positively affects the value of the perception of a destination and word-of-mouth communication. However, destination image had no effect on the intention to revisit. The value perceived from a destination positively affected the likelihood of revisiting and suggesting the destination to others. The results of the study are discussed, and limitations and suggestions related to the study are presented.

Key words: Destination image (DI); Perceived value (PV); Intention of revisiting; Word-of- mouth communication; Festival tourism

Address correspondence to Mehmet Oğuzhan İlban, The School of Applied Sciences, The University of BalıkesirBalıkesir 10700, Burhaniye, Turkey. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Analysis, Vol. 20, pp. 511–522
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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/108354215X
14411980111415
E-ISSN 1943-3999
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Moderating Effects of Tourists’ Novelty-Seeking Tendencies on the Relationship Between Satisfaction and Behavioral Intention

Sungsoo Kim* and Heeyoung Kim†

*Department of Economic Development & Tourism, College of Business, University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, MS, USA
EZpmp Co. Ltd., Seoul, Republic of Korea

Novelty seeking is an important motivator of travel, and has been identified as one factor in why satisfied visitors may not return to the same destination. This study examined the extent to which novelty-seeking tendency influences the direction or strength of the relationship between satisfaction and tourists’ behavioral intentions. The results indicated that novelty-seeking tendency weakened the relationship between overall satisfaction and revisit intention. However, novelty-seeking tendency strengthened the relationship between overall satisfaction and tourists’ intention to search for similar alternatives, and further to recommend a destination to others, which may create the potential for positive word-of-mouth communication.

Key words: Destination marketing; Moderating effects; Novelty-seeking tendency; Behavioral intention; Overall satisfaction

Address correspondence to Sungsoo Kim, Ph.D., Department of Economic Development & Tourism, College of Business, University of Southern Mississippi, Sciannaa Hall, 3077, 118 College Drive, #5176, Hattiesburg, MS 39406, USA. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Analysis, Vol. 20, pp. 523–537
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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/108354215X
14411980111451
E-ISSN 1943-3999
Copyright ©
2015 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
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An Investigation of Environmental and Situational Factors Affecting Tourists’ Behavioral Intention to Choose Bangkok as Their Final Destination

Chompoonut Suttikun,* Hyo Jung Chang,* Rosechongporn Komolsevin,† and Srisuda Chongsithiphol

*Department of Hospitality and Retail Management, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX, USA
†Graduate School, Bangkok University, Bangkok, Thailand
‡College of Management, University of PhayaoPhayao, Thailand

This study aims to explore the factors attracting international tourists to visit Bangkok. A total of 396 questionnaires were completed by participants, and they were tourists who visited the main three tourist attractions in Bangkok. The results showed that international tourists were attracted to visit Bangkok by physical attractions, sociopsychological attractions, and available time. Most tourists decided to visit Bangkok as a tourist destination. In terms of physical attractions, tourists decided to go to Bangkok to escape the terrible winters of their hometown. Regarding sociopsychological attractions, tourists desired to go to Bangkok because of attitudes of local people. In addition, the amount of time tourists could spend traveling in Bangkok matched with tourists’ available vacation time, which motivated them to visit Bangkok. The finding of this study suggests that infrastructure and facilities of physical and sociopsychological attractions need to be developed to attract more international tourists to visit Bangkok.

Key words: International tourists; Attractions; Situations; Destination; Bangkok

Address correspondence to Hyo Jung Chang, Assistant Professor, Department of Hospitality and Retail Management, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX 79409, USA. Tel: 806-834-5521; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Analysis, Vol. 20, pp. 539–549
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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/108354215X
14411980111497
E-ISSN 1943-3999
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The Benefits of Short Stay Caravan Travel Based on the Lived Experiences of Grey Caravanners in Australia

Ian Patterson,* Shane Pegg,* and Renuka Mahadevan

*School of Business (Tourism), The University of Queensland, Queensland, Australia
†School of Economics, The University of Queensland, Queensland, Australia

Recently there has been an abundance of research on “grey nomad” travel in Australia and this subset of drive tourism is regarded as an expanding travel market segment. Grey nomads are older people, 55 years and older, who travel independently for extended periods of time. However, little attention has been given to short-stay travel by older adults who are members of a caravan club. Such membership involves attendance at monthly rallies over a weekend at a selected destination that is usually approximately 200 km from the club’s base location. A total of 30 interviews were conducted to explore the benefits of short-stay caravanning to older people’s lives. A number of motivations emerged from the interviews, such as friendship with like-minded travelers; discovering new places; and experiencing feelings of enjoyment. Overall, short-stay travel was strongly linked to the importance of making new friends and being part of a social group, as well as the enjoyment received from discovering new and exciting places to visit.

Key words: Grey caravanners; Older travelers; Short-stay caravan travel; Motivations; Australia; Rural

Address correspondence to Dr. Ian Patterson, School of Business (Tourism), The University of Queensland, St Lucia Campus 4072, Queensland, Australia. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Analysis, Vol. 20, pp. 551–557
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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/108354215X
14411980111532
E-ISSN 1943-3999
Copyright ©
2015 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
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Research Note

Examining the Korean Inbound Tourism Market Cycle: A Markov Regime-Switching Model

Ming-Hsiang Chen,* Chien-Pang Lin,† Ming-Chang Cheng,‡ and Jo-Hsin Yuan*

*School of Hospitality Business Management, Carson College of Business, Washington State University, Pullman, WA, USA
†Department of Finance, Chang Jung Christian University, Tainan, Taiwan, ROC
‡Department of Business Administration, National Chung Cheng University, Chia-Yi, Taiwan, ROC

This study analyzes the Korean inbound tourism market (KITM) cycle and the driving forces of the KITM cycle. Based on data of tourism receipts from 1976 Q1 to 2012 Q2, the Markov regime-switching model identifies two distinct regimes of the KITM cycle: a high-growth regime and a low-growth regime, each with its own mean, variance, and duration. Moreover, in addition to the growth rate of tourist arrivals, the growth rate of international trade is found to be significant in keeping the KITM cycle in the high-growth regime. Empirical findings can offer essential information and policy implications for Korean government tourism policymakers and business managers.

Key words: Korea; Inbound tourism market; Markov regime-switching model

Address correspondence to Ming-Hsiang Chen, School of Hospitality Business Management, Carson College of Business, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-4742, USA. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Analysis, Vol. 20, pp. 561–571
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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/108354215X
14411980111613
E-ISSN 1943-3999
Copyright ©
2015 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Review

Academic Insulae: The Search for a Paradigm in and for Tourism Studies

Vincent Platenkamp

Cross-cultural Understanding, NHTV University of Applied Sciences, Breda, The Netherlands

Epistemological relativism in tourism studies has been conceivably paralyzed by the concept of a, or, the “paradigm.” In this review article, Platenkamp metaphorically identifies these paradigms with the islands that Odysseus visited (all those centuries ago) during his well-recorded journey to Ithaca. In this context, therefore, Ithaca is changed (by Platenkamp) from being just an idyllic Greek homeland into a contemporary, hybridized world like—in our time—of the multilayered network society in Africa of the capital of Ghana, Kumasi. The basic question for Platenkamp, then, is that of how tourism studies researchers can (or ought?) leave their safe islands (i.e., their paradigms) and organize their own paradigm dialog (after Guba) with others around them on their uncertain and risky voyage to Kumasi. In an attempt to clarify this vital kind of dialog, Platenkamp introduces Said’s principles of reception and resistance, but also focuses on the distinction between different modes of “knowledge production” that have been introduced into the social sciences since the 1990s. In this light, to Platenkamp, the uncertainty of this ongoing/unending epistemological quest remains crucial: to him, all (almost all?) believers in a, or any, paradigm within tourism studies are unhealthily “overimmunized” by the tall claims and the perhaps undersuspected strategies of the particular “paradigm” they follow. (Abstract by the Reviews Editor)

Key words: Odyssey of tourism studies; Research paradigm; Paradigm dialog; Reception and resistance; Modes 1, 2, and 3 of knowledge production; Said

Address correspondence to Dr. Vincent Platenkamp, Associate Professor of Cross-cultural Understanding, NHTV, University of Applied Sciences, Mgr. Hopmansstraat 1: 4817 JT, Breda, The Netherlands. Fax: 0031(0)765332295; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it