Tourism Culture & Communication 15(2) Abstracts

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Tourism, Culture & Communication, Vol. 15, pp. 69–85
1098-304X/15 $60.00
+ .00
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/109830415X
14401707765845
E-ISSN 1943-4146
Copyright ©
2015 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

These Are a Few of my Favorite Things: The Search for Authenticity in Sound of Music Tourism

Terri Toles Patkin

Communication Department, Eastern Connecticut State University, Willimantic, CT, USA

The tension between the physical and the virtual is explored in the context of the quest for authenticity in tourism through the autoethnographic description of a participant on The Sound of Music bus tour in Salzburg. The tour demonstrates multiple interpretations of the contested concept of authenticity simultaneously including objective and subjective authenticity, staged authenticity, emergent authenticity, hyperreality, and existential authenticity, despite the tour operators’ framing of the trip almost entirely in objectivist terms. As participants cross the boundary between lived and mediated experience, the juxtaposition of authentic and inauthentic reveals itself in the tourist’s parasocial relationship with the characters in the movie.

Key words: Authenticity; Film; Performativity; Tourism

Address correspondence to Terri Toles Patkin, Professor, Communication Department, Eastern Connecticut State University, Willimantic, CT 06226, USA. Tel: 860-465-5368; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism, Culture & Communication, Vol. 15, pp. 87–101
1098-304X/15 $60.00
+ .00
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/109830415X
14401707765881
E-ISSN 1943-4146
Copyright ©
2015 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Remember it Well: Epiphanies, Nostalgia, and Urban Exploration as Mediators of Tourist Memory

Peter Robinson

Department for Marketing, Innovation, Leisure and Enterprise, University of WolverhamptonWolverhampton, UK

This article takes the author’s own nostalgic feelings for a now defunct theme park and translates these into an analysis of other people’s tourism-related nostalgic experiences. In doing so, the article furthers discussion around nostalgia and memory within tourism and approaches new ground in the use of images, online forums, and urban exploration as mediators of individual and shared nostalgias. It has also been argued that while nostalgia is a key motivational factor in tourist decision making, it has not been fully explored. Furthermore, this article uniquely focuses on younger people where previous research has considered older age groups. As a consequence, the semiautoethnographic discussion, supported with quantitative and phenomenological content analysis of online forums, explores the creation of tourist epiphanies and identifies key themes around family, repeat visitation, and the preplanned creation of new nostalgias within hyperreal environments.

Key words: Experience; Family; Nostalgia; Repeat visitation; Tourist gaze; Urban exploration

Address correspondence to Peter Robinson, Principal Lecturer and Head of Department for Marketing, Innovation, Leisure and Enterprise, University of Wolverhampton Business School, Nursery Street, City Campus North, Wolverhampton, WV1 1AD, UK. Tel: 01902 323149; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism, Culture & Communication, Vol. 15, pp. 103–119
1098-304X/15 $60.00
+ .00
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/109830415X
14401707765926
E-ISSN 1943-4146
Copyright ©
2015 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Resident Perceptions of Community Tourism in Cape Verde

Ana Maria Castillo Canalejo, Julia Nunez Tabales, Jose Maria Cerezo Lopez, and Fernando J. Fuentes-Garcia

Faculty of Business and Law, University of Cordoba, Cordoba, Spain

Community tourism appears to be an alternative that mitigates the negative effects of mass tourism in less developed countries. In this kind of tourism, the attitudes and perceptions of residents play an important role in tourism planning and development. In this article, we analyze the perceptions and attitudes of residents in community tourism in the Island of Santo Antao (Cape Verde), an emerging tourist destination that is currently experiencing a considerable increase of tourists—which is altering the way of life of its communities. The fieldwork was carried out based on a survey of residents. The questionnaire was filled out by a random sample of respondents, with a total of 319 questionnaires obtained. The main results reveal that residents are in favor of tourism development, due to the positive benefits that it can bring, such as the recovery of traditional handicrafts, more investment in infrastructures, and higher quality hospitality and retail establishments. However, in order for tourism on the island to be sustainable and for the residents’ perceived benefits to materialize, tourism initiatives need more participation by local residents, public administrators, universities, and nongovernmental organizations.

Key words: Community tourism; Development; Perception; Residents

Address correspondence to ANA Maria Castillo Canalejo, Faculty of Business and Law, University of Cordoba, C/Puerta Nueva, 18071 Cordoba, Spain. Tel: +34957218870; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism, Culture & Communication, Vol. 15, pp. 121–139
1098-304X/15 $60.00
+ .00
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/109830415X
14401707765962
E-ISSN 1943-4146
Copyright ©
2015 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Reversing Visitor Harassment Through Deliberate Intelligence Building Strategies

Annmarie Nicely

School of Hospitality & Tourism Management, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, USA

The goal of the article was to use learning theories to highlight strategies likely to have a significant positive impact on small independent traders’ long-term acquisition of nonaggressive selling behaviors. The work of approximately 300 learning scholars was reviewed. The results of an observational study on Jamaican craft markets were also reported. It was hypothesized that for small traders to acquire nonaggressive selling behaviors, over the long term, they must have significant intelligence in both effectivemicrotrade and self-management and such intelligence can be effectively built through the use of special instructional methodologies like cooperative learning, dialoging, and critiquing. Also, their acquisition of critical knowledge on microtrade would likely improve if they are provided with trading spaces that are open, comfortable, safe, and busy, as well as with a knowledge repository that collects and disseminates the latest information on microtrade from and to their communities, respectively. The article has implications for both how governments and their affiliates manage small traders’ learning at tourist destinations and the direction of future visitor harassment research.

Key words: Knowledge transfer; Learning; Microtrade; Visitor harassment

Address correspondence to Annmarie Nicely, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, School of Hospitality & Tourism Management, 239 Marriott Hall, Purdue University, 900 W. State Street, West Lafayette, IN 47907, USA. Tel: 765-494-4740; Fax: 765-494-0327; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism, Culture & Communication, Vol. 15, pp. 141–156
1098-304X/15 $60.00
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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/109830415X
14401707766006
E-ISSN 1943-4146
Copyright ©
2015 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Managing Heritage Tourism in the Decapolis Sites of Jordan: Planning Opportunities and Challenges

Abdelkader Ababneh

Department of Travel & Tourism, Yarmouk University, Irbid, Jordan

Heritage
tourism in Jordanian archeological sites experiences a wide range of problems, and current planning does not address all the difficulties in an adequate manner or in an equal depth. The primary goal of this article is to gain a better idea about present heritage tourism management in the Decapolis sites in Jordan. The article describes how heritage sites and heritage tourism are suffering chronic problems despite their valuable potential to offer heritage values within the framework of heritage tourism. In addition, the article is concerned with analyzing the main challenges that site operators have to face and how they can be overcome. The main questions that this article seeks to address are: 1) What are the proper approaches to heritage tourism planning at the site as well as its immediate surroundings? 2) What are the motives behind their nomination in the tentative list of World Heritage? In order to find answers to the research questions, the research on the three cases has focused on two main sources of evidence: on-site interviews and direct observation supported by documentation review. The article concludes that heritage tourism in the sites being investigated lacks a systematic integrated planning. Therefore, it is recommended that continuous comprehensive planning that views heritage and tourism from different perspectives be considered when developing any cultural heritage tourism project. The value of this article lies in the fact that it seeks to contribute to the sparse investigated heritage tourism management for archeological sites of the Decapolis cities.

Key words: Heritage tourism; Management and planning; Challenges and opportunities, Decapolis sites; Jordan

Address correspondence to Abdelkader Ababneh, Department of Travel & Tourism, Yarmouk University, Irbid, Jordan. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism, Culture & Communication, Vol. 15, pp. 157–163
1098-304X/15 $60.00
+ .00
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/109830415X
14401707766042
E-ISSN 1943-4146
Copyright ©
2015 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Research Note

Agglomeration Effects and Firm Performance in Cultural Value Chain

Belén Usero* and Jesús Del Brío†

*Institute of Entrepreneurship and Family Business, University Carlos III of Madrid, Madrid, Spain
†Business Department, University of Oviedo, Oviedo, Spain

The aim of this article is to analyze the relationship between location and performance of cultural firms. The authors explore the sources of agglomeration benefits in cultural industries from the supply side and the demand side. In the context of Spain, the results show that the geographic concentration of cultural firms has a positive and significant influence in firm performance. Moreover, the results show asymmetric benefits of colocation by their position in the cultural value chain. The article discusses specifically the importance of the agglomeration concept for tourism, notably in some areas of Spain like Madrid or Catalonia. This article includes information to policy makers and entrepreneurs of the importance of business clustering and how cultural industries can generate a greater attraction for tourism.

Key words: Cultural firms; Location; Agglomeration; Value chain; Performance

Address correspondence to Belén Usero, Institute of Entrepreneurship and Family Business, University Carlos III of Madrid, C/ Madrid 126, Madrid, ES 28903, Spain. Tel: +34 916245739; Fax: +34 916245707; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it