Tourism Analysis 21(1) Abstracts

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Tourism Analysis, Vol. 21, pp. 1-15
1083-5423/16 $60.00 +.00
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/108354216X
14537459508739
E-ISSN 1943-3999

Copyright ©2016 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

THE AUGMENTED CONVENTION OFFERING: THE IMPACT OF DESTINATION AND PRODUCT IMAGES ON ATTENDEES’ PERCEIVED BENEFITS

MAKARAND MODY,* SUSAN GORDON,† XINRAN LEHTO,† SIU-IAN (AMY) SO,‡ AND MIMI LI§

*School of Hospitality Administration, Boston University, Boston, MA, USA
†School of Hospitality & Tourism Management, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, USA
‡Faculty of Business Administration, University of Macau, Taipa, Macau, China
§School of Hotel & Tourism Management, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Kowloon, Hong Kong

In order to benefit from the significant dual spending of meetings, incentives, conventions/conferences, exhibitions/events (MICE) attendees, destination marketers have attempted to identify key success criteria that enable increased convention and exhibition participation. Given the significant growth of the MICE industry in Asia, this study examines the role of destination and product images on Chinese attendees’ perceptions of the benefits acquired through convention and exhibition participation in the regions of Macau and Hong Kong. Data were collected using an intercept survey and a systematic random sampling procedure. Structural Equation Modeling was used to test a model that integrates two strands of literature from the fields of marketing and international business: Product–Country Image (PCI) and the Augmented Service Offering (ASO). Results show that a favorable overall destination image positively impacts the image of the MICE product of the destination, which, in turn, leads to a greater perception of personal and professional benefit acquisition. Based on these findings, the authors propose the Augmented MICE Offering as a theoretical framework that can serve as a foundation for more comprehensive inquiry into the decision-making process of the MICE attendee and postattendance behavioral impacts. The study also provides important positioning and communication implications for MICE destinations.

Key words: Destination image; Augmented service offering (ASO); Convention; Exhibition; Motivation

Address correspondence to Makarand Mody, School of Hospitality Administration, Boston University, 928 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA 02215, USA. Tel: +1 617-358-1620; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Analysis, Vol. 21, pp. 17-28
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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/108354216X14537459508775
E-ISSN 1943-3999
Copyright ©2016 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

DESTINATION ATTRIBUTES AND OVERALL DESTINATION SATISFACTION IN ZIMBABWE

GETRUDE KWANISAI* AND SEBASTIAN VENGESAYI†

*Travel and Recreation Department, Chinhoyi University of Technology, Chinhoyi, Zimbabwe
†School of Hospitality and Tourism, Chinhoyi University of Technology, Chinhoyi, Zimbabwe

Tourist satisfaction assessment is important for successful management of tourism destinations. Attribute satisfaction contributes towards overall destination satisfaction; however, there is limited research on this relationship. This study sought to assess the extent to which international tourists are satisfied with specific destination attributes in Zimbabwe and evaluate the contribution of each attribute towards overall destination satisfaction. A survey was conducted around Zimbabwe’s major tourist areas. The study established that international tourists are generally satisfied with Zimbabwe as a destination. Tourists are most satisfied with attractions and not satisfied with immigration. Accommodation had the greatest contribution towards destination satisfaction while transport and intermediaries did not make any significant contribution. Key among the article’s recommendations is that the destination attributes not satisfying tourists should be addressed as a matter of urgency to improve Zimbabwe’s destination image and attractiveness. Also, the destination should plan tourism products considering the level of contribution made by the individual attributes towards destination satisfaction.

Key words: Destination attributes; Destination satisfaction; Tourist satisfaction assessment; International tourists; Zimbabwe

Address correspondence to Getrude Kwanisai, Travel and Recreation Department, School of Hospitality and Tourism, Chinhoyi University of Technology, Private Bag 7724, Chinhoyi, Zimbabwe. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it  or This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Analysis, Vol. 21, pp. 29-45
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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/108354216X14537459508810
E-ISSN 1943-3999
Copyright ©2016 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

COMPETITION IN TOURISM ARRIVALS: A MULTIDIMENSIONAL INDEX OF GEOGRAPHICAL STRUCTURAL SIMILARITY

NUNO CRESPO, NÁDIA NOGUEIRA SIMÕES, AND JOSE MARIA DUARTE

ISCTE Business School Economics Department, Instituto Universitario de Lisboa (ISCTE-IUL), Lisbon, Portugal

Given the economic importance of the tourism sector, countries actively compete for attracting tourism flows. In a bilateral perspective, an important determinant of the degree of competition is the geographical structure of tourism inflows (i.e., the relative importance of the different source countries). A higher overlap of these flows indicates greater competition. The present study proposes a methodological approach to quantify this overlap. Taking some indicators traditionally used in international trade analysis as inspiration, we propose a methodology that measures, for each pair of countries, the degree of similarity between the geographical structures of tourism inflows. The methodology takes a multidimensional concept of structural similarity in order to incorporate relevant dimensions of international tourism flows today.

Key words: Tourism flows; Arrivals; Geographical similarity; Competitiveness; Index

Address correspondence to Nadia Simoes, ISCTE Business School Economics Department, Research Unit, ISCTE-IUL, Av. Forcas Armadas, 1649-026, Lisbon, Portugal. Tel: +351217903441. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Analysis, Vol. 21, pp. 47-59
1083-5423/16 $60.00 +.00
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/108354216X14537459508856
E-ISSN 1943-3999
Copyright ©2016 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

MOBILITIES FOR TOURISM STUDIES AND “BEYOND”: A POLEMIC

ADAM DOERING* AND TARA DUNCAN†

*Center for Tourism Research, Wakayama University, Wakayama, Japan
†Department of Tourism, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand

This article offers a polemic directed against the largely unchallenged incorporation of mobilities within tourism studies. The mobilities paradigm may offer many constructive insights for the field of tourism; however, this article argues that the concept has been received rather uncritically by tourism scholarship and needs further critical appraisal. As a polemic, the article is designed to invite reaction as well as offer a counterpoint for those who may also feel uncomfortable with the seemingly “natural” progression from tourism studies to tourism mobilities. The aim of the article is twofold: first to open up a more nuanced debate of the philosophical stakes of mobilities for tourism studies, and second to renew the question and explore different possibilities of what constitutes a mobile philosophy today. By critically examining the paradox underpinning mobilities’ ambition to “stabilize a world on the move” and closely interrogating the literature suggesting the paradigm shift signals “the end of tourism,” the article explores how a nuanced rereading of the philosophical stakes of mobilities ultimately signals a return to tourism studies rather than moving “beyond” it. The article concludes by opening up a creative, destabilizing, and pluralizing mobile philosophy for tourism and mobility scholarship to consider.

Key words: Mobilities paradigm; Postdisciplinary; The end of tourism; Mobile philosophy

Address correspondence to Adam Doering, Center for Tourism Research, Wakayama University, Sakaedani 930, Wakayama City, Wakayama, 640-8510, Japan. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Analysis, Vol. 21, pp. 61-76
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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/108354216X14537459508892
E-ISSN 1943-3999
Copyright ©2016 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

THE QUAGMIRE OF STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT IN TOURISM PLANNING: A CASE EXAMPLE FROM AUSTRALIA

CHRISTOF PFORR* AND MARTIN BRUECKNER†

*School of Marketing, Curtin Business School, Curtin University, Perth, Australia
†Centre for Responsible Citizenship and Sustainability, School of Management and Governance, Murdoch University, Perth, Australia

After its first election win in August 2001 since the Northern Territory of Australia (NT) was granted self-government (1978), the incoming NT Labor government released a new tourism plan, the Northern Territory Tourism Strategic Plan—2003–2007 in the following year. Turbulent events of 2001 that had a significant impact on the tourism industry in the NT and included the collapse of the Australian carrier Ansett Airlines and “September 11” provided the impetus for the new strategy. Purportedly, this plan was designed to direct and guide the NT tourism industry’s future development based on sound research and extensive consultation with key stakeholders. Such a partnership approach was regarded as crucial for the success of future tourism in the Territory. This article specifically focuses on the formulation process of this Tourism Strategic Plan, exploring in particular the effectiveness of the underlying consultation process. Adopting amicroperspective on tourism planning processes with the NT case example we portray a unique case that allows us to highlight not only the complex and dynamic nature of tourism planning during times of significant change in the Territory’s political landscape, but also the often-experienced contradictions between tourism planning rhetoric and practice. Even though we explore a planning process that dates back about a decade, we believe that the findings of the study are relevant and inform current tourism policy and planning discourses.

Key words: Planning; Consultation; Tourism plan; Stakeholders; Northern Territory (NT) of Australia

Address correspondence to Christof Pforr, School of Marketing, Curtin Business School, Curtin University, Bentley Campus GPO Box U1987, Perth 6845, Western Australia, Australia. Tel: +61 8 9266 7743; Fax: +61 8 9266 3937; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Analysis, Vol. 21, pp. 77-91
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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/108354216X14537459508937
E-ISSN 1943-3999
Copyright ©2016 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

A WINE TOURIST BEHAVIOR MODEL FOR AUSTRALIAN WINERY CELLAR DOORS

XIAOYU CHEN,* JOHAN BRUWER,† JUSTIN COHEN,‡ AND STEVE GOODMAN*

*Business School, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, Australia
†School of Marketing, University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia
‡Ehrenberg-Bass Institute for Marketing Science, University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia

This study features an exploration of the effects of winery cellar door inputs on visitors’ value perception, overall satisfaction, and behavioral intentions. Using partial least squares (PLS) path modeling, it demonstrates that a winery’s environment and service interactions significantly affect visitors’ perceptions of wine quality. The findings indicate that contrary to popular belief, perceptions of wine quality do not directly influence visitors’ overall satisfaction at a cellar door. Instead, its impact on overall satisfaction is mediated by visitors’ perceptions of the value they received for the money they spent on wine products. It was also found that visitors’ value-for-money perceptions and overall satisfaction fully mediate the relationship between a cellar door’s inputs and its patrons’ postvisit behavioral intentions, suggesting that weaknesses associated with wine products can be overcome by reducing the price of those products. This research contributes to a better understanding of cellar door visitors’ decision-making processes and provides managers and researchers with new insights on how to effectively accommodate cellar door visitors’ needs.

Key words: Wine tourism; Cellar door; Partial least squares (PLS); Visitor satisfaction; Behavioral intentions

Address correspondence to Xiaoyu Chen, Ph.D. student, Business School, The University of Adelaide, Level 9, 10 Pulteney Street, Adelaide, SA 5005, Australia. Tel: +61 420 427 537; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Analysis, Vol. 21, pp. 93-106
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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/108354216X14537459508973
E-ISSN 1943-3999
Copyright ©2016 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

COMPETITIVE DETERMINANCE–PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS: AN ILLUSTRATION ON TURKISH WINTER TOURISM DESTINATIONS

EMRE ERBAS

School of Tourism and Hospitality Management, Gaziosmanpaşa University, TokatZile, Turkey

Importance–Performance Analysis (IPA) is accepted as a simple and substantial technique that enables decision makers in prioritizing the competitiveness needs of tourism destinations over and above enhancing products and services in general. Unfortunately, the prioritization based on only importance could be misleading when the competitiveness analysis included in IPA. To resolve this issue, a revised IPA, namely Competitive Determinance–Performance Analysis (CDPA), which is a combination of Attribute–Determinance Analysis (ADA), Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP), and IPA is presented. A Turkish winter sports destination case is presented to illustrate the implementation of the proposed CDPA. The results of this case study illustrate reliable and precise action directions using CDPA, which empowers destination decision makers to gain a competitive advantage compared to their competitors. CDPA is appropriate not only for tourism but also for other areas of management or marketing of a product or service.

Key words: Attribute determinance analysis (ADA); Destination competitiveness; Winter tourism

Address correspondence to Emre Erbas, Assistant Professor, School of Tourism and Hospitality Management, Gaziosmanpaşa University, Tokat, 60400, Zile, Turkey. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Analysis, Vol. 21, pp. 107-116
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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/108354216X14537459509017
E-ISSN 1943-3999
Copyright ©2016 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

RESEARCH NOTE

USING THEMATIC ANALYSIS IN TOURISM RESEARCH

TRUDIE WALTERS

School of Business, University of the Sunshine Coase, Maroochydore, Australia

This research note uses a case study approach to illustrate when and how to apply thematic analysis as a tool to interpret empirical material in tourism research and suggests a variety of research contexts in which its use may be appropriate. The case study demonstrates the value of thematic analysis in understanding and unpacking a body of rich, descriptive media text (such as magazine articles, social media, and marketing material). This note also establishes that thematic analysis can be successfully used with visual material, taking intertextuality into account to facilitate a well-balanced interpretation of underlying cultural meanings. A further strength is the ability to produce graphic representations of the analysis, which then provide a suitable structure for discussing the findings. Using research carried out on second-home articles in a New Zealand magazine from 1936 to 2012 to illustrate the process, a step by step description of how to apply thematic analysis to written and visual text is provided. It also provides a set of criteria to ensure the trustworthiness of the research output, and as such is a valuable guide to carrying out a rigorous thematic analysis of texts in a variety of tourism research contexts.

Key words: Thematic analysis; Visual text; Media; Tourism; Second homes

Address correspondence to Trudie Walters, School of Business, University of the Sunshine Coast, ML8 Locked Bag 4, Maroochydore DC, QLD 4572, Australia. Tel: +61 7 5459 4460; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Analysis, Vol. 21, pp. 117-122
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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/108354216X14537459509053
E-ISSN 1943-3999
Copyright ©2016 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

RESEARCH NOTE

THE STAGNATION OF SUMMER GLACIER SKIING

MARTIN FALK

Austrian Institute of Economic Research (WIFO), Vienna, Austria

After a short boom phase between the late 1970s and early 1980s, the number of passengers transported in glacier skiing areas during the summer season stagnated. Estimates derived from dynamic panel data models based on detailed lift data show that demand for glacier skiing in the summer season is significantly and positively related to real private consumption, and significantly and negatively related to tourism prices. Furthermore, for the highest sections of these skiing areas (around 3,000 m above sea level), we find that natural snow depth is significantly and positively related to the number of passengers transported uphill.

Key words: Summer skiing areas; Glacier skiing; Number of visitors; Snow conditions; Income and price elasticities

Address correspondence to Martin Falk, Austrian Institute of Economic Research (WIFO), Arsenal Objekt 20, A-1030 Vienna, Austria. Tel: 004317982601-226; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it