Tourism Analysis 21(4) Abstracts

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Tourism Analysis, Vol. 21, pp. 349–361
1083-5423/16 $60.00 + .00
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/108354216X14600320851613
E-ISSN 1943-3999
Copyright © 2016 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Postdisciplinarity and the Rise of Intellectual Openness: The Necessity for “Plural Knowability” in Tourism Studies

Keith Hollinshead

The Bedfordshire Business School, University of Bedfordshire, Luton, UK

In this article—which is based on my keynote presentation at the “Welcoming Encounters: Tourism Research in a Postdisciplinary Era” 2013 conference at the Institute of Ethnology, University of Neuchatel, Switzerland—I maintain that postdisciplinarity is a form of painstaking (in time and effort) inquiry that makes considered use of academic and nonacademic forms of knowing to trace the plural truths that apply in difficult-to-fathom globalizing/decolonizing/postcolonial settings. In this article, I suggest that open-to-the-future postdisciplinary styles of research are critically valuable where a range or multiplicity of interpretive cultural/cosmological outlooks on the world has been poorly understood, and where important longstanding or emergent en groupeperspectives have been ignored or subjugated by governing powers/agencies. In suggesting that those who work in tourism scenarios regularly have to deal with such difficult contestations of value across the globe—where the poesis or the fantasmatics of local/contesting populations are decidedly different—I draw particularly on Gilroy’s work on “diaspora” and on Bhabha’s thinking on “emergent/hybrid locations of culture” to highlight the sorts of difficult-to-read ambivalent/protean/transgressive identifications that are readily the stuff of postdisciplinary inquiry. The article closes with the recognition that today, postdisciplinary investigators can harness much from the recent liberation in “social justice research practices” that Denzin and Lincoln (and their myriad of diverse critico-interpretive/qualitative researchers) have advocated, notably the advances in “bricoleurship” recently conceptualized by Kincheloe.

Key words: Internarrative; Hegemony; Eurocentrism; Fantasmatics; Multiple voices; Plural knowability; Darklight tourism

Address correspondence to Keith Hollinshead, The Bedfordshire Business School, University of Bedfordshire, Park Square, Luton LU1

3JU, UK. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Tourism Analysis, Vol. 21, pp. 363–372
1083-5423/16 $60.00 + .00
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/108354216X14600320851659
E-ISSN 1943-3999
Copyright © 2016 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

From Disciplinarity to Postdisciplinarity: Tourism Studies Dedisciplined

Frédéric Darbellay

Inter- and Transdisciplinarity Unit, Interfaculty Centre for Children’s Rights, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland

Inter- and transdisciplinarity are currently experiencing real development within the national and international university landscape. Moreover, they now feature explicitly on the agendas of political and academic organizations that promote and fund scientific research. The increasing focus on interdisciplinarity in the sciences and humanities, in general, and tourism studies, in particular, reflects an awareness of the complexity of research, which is increasingly confronted with social issues that require dialogue between the institutionalized disciplines. Today, the rooted disciplines face a crisis in meeting the ambitions and expectations of many researchers who question both the potential and limits of their own disciplines and the ways in which they can establish new connections with other disciplines. This article aims to explore the implications of a possible postdisciplinary era in which knowledge would be constructed on the ruins of disciplines from a disciplinary or antidisciplinary perspective. I try to define “postdisciplinarity” and its links to inter- and transdisciplinarity and show how they can be similar or, conversely, dissimilar. In a more consensual vein, I show how it is possible to reconcile the desire to end disciplines and the need to take them into account—or even rethink them. Tourism studies are taken here as a prototypical example of the integration between and beyond disciplines with a view to analyzing and understanding the complexity of tourism activities.

Key words: Disciplinarity; Interdisciplinarity; Transdisciplinarity; Postdisciplinarity; Tourism Studies

Address correspondence to Frédéric Darbellay, Inter- and Transdisciplinarity Unit, Interfaculty Centre for Children’s Rights, University of Geneva, Site UNIGE-Valais, Case postale 4176, 1950 Sion 4, Switzerland. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Analysis, Vol. 21, pp. 373–387
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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/108354216X14679788636113
E-ISSN 1943-3999
Copyright © 2016 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Tourism and Postdisciplinarity: Back to the Future?

Tim Coles,* C. Michael Hall,† and David Timothy Duval‡

*The Business School, University of Exeter, Exeter, UK
†Department of Management, Marketing, and Entrepreneurship, University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand
‡Faculty of Business and Administration, University of Winnipeg, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada

This article revisits postdisciplinary approaches to the study of tourism that were first proposed around a decade ago. Specifically, it sets out to examine the extent to which such approaches have continued relevance to tourism scholarship moving forward. Basic literature searches suggest that the world has changed, yet the tourism academy has not. Traditional disciplines, especially in the social sciences, continue to be the basic building blocks of knowledge production in tourism. However, if a more sophisticated approach is taken to analysis, there is ample evidence of more reasonable, flexible approaches to inquiry about tourism—in particular in the areas of tourism mobilities and climate change. Free from disciplinary dogma and orchestration, these take as their initial cues issues, questions, or problems and how best to tackle them. Indeed, the evidence points to a future trajectory even further in this direction. Many of the major issues facing the research community are so wide in scope and complex in nature that they require academic coalitions to tackle them. Discipline-specific or discipline-exclusive approaches will not suffice on their own. More than 10 years ago, the move toward postdisciplinary modes of inquiry was argued to be inevitable, mainly from intellectual grounds. Although this rationale remains valid, the article argues that unfolding institutional structures and the organization of higher education are also far more encouraging of postdisciplinary approaches. Research investment, especially in advanced economies, is increasingly being targeted toward grand challenges and transformative research.

Key words: Postdisciplinarity; Tourism; Mobilities; Grand challenges; Transformative research

Address correspondence to Tim Coles, The Business School, University of Exeter, Streatham Court, Rennes Drive, Exeter, Devon EX4 4PU, UK. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Analysis, Vol. 21, pp. 389–401
1083-5423/16 $60.00 + .00
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/108354216X14600320851730
E-ISSN 1943-3999
Copyright © 2016 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Existential Postdisciplinarity: Personal Journeys Into Tourism, Art, and Freedom

Tomas Pernecky,* Ana María Munar,† and Brian Wheeller‡

*School of Hospitality and Tourism, Auckland University of Technology, Auckland, New Zealand
†Department of International Economics and Management, Copenhagen Business School, Copenhagen, Denmark
‡Department of International Tourism, Breda University of Applied Sciences (NHTV), Breda, the Netherlands

Postdisciplinarity makes claims on ontological, epistemic, and methodological levels, but it is inevitably a personal philosophical stance. This article represents an existentialist approach to the discourse on postdisciplinarity, offering reflective narratives of three academics. Tomas Pernecky discusses creativity, criticality, freedom, and methodological and epistemic pluralism; Ana María Munar reveals her journey of epistemological awakening; and Brian Wheeller underscores the importance of researchers’ subjective and emotive voice. Jointly, the authors depict postdisciplinarity as an invitation to conceptual and interpretive eclecticism, critical analysis, and creative problem solving.

Key words: Constructionism; Existential; Identity; Knowledge; Subjective; Truth

Address correspondence to Tomas Pernecky, School of Hospitality and Tourism, Auckland University of Technology, Private Bag 92006, Auckland 1142, New Zealand. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Analysis, Vol. 21, pp. 403–415
1083-5423/16 $60.00 + .00
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/108354216X14600320851776
E-ISSN 1943-3999
Copyright © 2016 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Packing as Practice: Creative Knowledges Through Material Interactions

Kaya Barry

School
of Communication and Creative Arts, Deakin University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

Tourists are presented with a range of material and interpersonal interactions that often develop into collaborative and creative modes of knowledge production. There is a current push to acknowledge processes and experiences as forged through material relations, for which tourism processes present a range of examples. This article advocates that the study of tourism needs to take a postdisciplinary approach that merges practice and theory, using the process of packing a bag as the primary example. A rethinking of material relations presents affirmative, global, and nomadic encounters for a multitude of actors and situations. In the rigorous, daily process of packing, objects are transformed into fluid, malleable forms—as a mass of material that is being collaboratively negotiated. In this way, materially driven processes open up collective experiences that offer methods of creative knowledge production. Drawing on interviews and photographic documentation of tourists packing, this article demonstrates the potential for postdisciplinarity research that examines possibilities for collaborative forms of creative knowledge production.

Key words: Creative knowledge; Postdisciplinary; Collective action; Materiality

Address correspondence to Kaya Barry, Faculty of Arts and Education—EB Building, Deakin University, 221 Burwood Highway, Burwood, Victoria 3125, Australia. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Analysis, Vol. 21, pp. 417–430
1083-5423/16 $60.00 + .00
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/108354216X14600320851811
E-ISSN 1943-3999
Copyright © 2016 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Getting Lost in the Field

Mads Bødker

Department of IT Management, Copenhagen Business School, Copenhagen, Denmark

This article explores the notion of “meditations” or a “meditative stance” in fieldwork, understood as shorthand for the simple practices of walking and sensing. I advocate an understanding of meditations as an alternative embodied mode of research that seeks to contemplate how a reflective attention to walking as a reflective engagement in a sensory landscape may be enrolled as embodied ways of knowing. Meditation performs the touristic and mobile body as a porous and affective site. Moving around on foot creates a sensibility that is often ignored when researchers and practitioners in information technology (IT) attend to the field to learn about tourism in ways that seek to inform design. This article attempts to open a discussion around what kinds of fieldwork and subsequent representations emphasize embodiment in the design of tourism technologies—how, in other words, researchers can attend to, and represent, the affective, vital qualities of living with technology and why this might be an increasingly relevant question to ask in the field that has become known as digital tourism. Stressing the inherent openness and contingency of meditation, the article hopes to stir the imaginative registers of scholars and to engender a postdisciplinary dialogue that challenges the field of IT design and information systems research to engage with vulnerable and open discourses in nonrepresentational theory, theories of affect, and place that have been consistently raised in human—or cultural—geography as well as anthropology in the past decades. The article weaves empirical incidents from fieldwork into a postdisciplinary theoretical landscape that spans mobilities, affect, the sensual, and embodiment. Emphasizing learning through the senses and the body and their importance to a sensory apprenticeship, the article suggests alternative routes to knowing and representation in the study of, and ultimately the design for, the digital tourist.

Key words: Walking; Technologies; Embodiment

Address correspondence to Mads Bødker, Department of IT Management, Copenhagen Business School, Howitzvej 60, 4. Floor, DK-2000 Frederiksberg, Copenhagen, Denmark. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it