Tourism Analysis 22(1) Abstracts

Return to Tourism Analysis>

Tourism Analysis, Vol. 22, pp. 1-18
1083-5423/17 $60.00 +.00
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3727/108354217X
14828625279573
E-ISSN 1943-3999
Copyright ©2017 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.


Appraisal and Coping Responses to Tourism Development-Related Stress

Evan J. Jordan and Christine A. Vogt

School of Community Resources and Development, Arizona State University, Phoenix, AZ, USA

Unmitigated stress can lead to a variety of negative health and emotional outcomes, negatively affecting overall quality of life. Individuals’ stress appraisal and coping responses to stress influence the extent to which they are affected by stress. This study explores the relationship between secondary stress appraisal (controllability) and coping responses to tourism-related stressors such as unmet development expectations. A total of 363 pen and paper surveys were administered face-to-face to a systematic random sample of residents of Falmouth, Jamaica—a community that recently hosted the development of a new Caribbean cruise port. A structural equation model revealed that the appraisal of stress as controllable had a significant positive relationship with problem-focused coping and positive outlook coping responses as well as a significant negative relationship with less effective wishful thinking coping responses. The appraisal of stress as controllable by someone else had a significant positive relationship with seeking social support coping responses. The appraisal of stress as uncontrollable was significantly negatively related with wishful thinking coping responses. This study is a first step toward understanding the complex and continually changing process of stress appraisal and coping engaged in by residents of a tourism host community.

Key words: Stress; Coping; Cruise tourism; Residents; Quality of life

Address correspondence to Evan J. Jordan, School of Community Resources and Development, Arizona State University, 411 N. Central Ave., Suite 550, Phoenix, AZ 85004, USA. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Analysis, Vol. 22, pp. 19-29
1083-5423/17 $60.00 +.00
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3727/108354217X
14828625279591
E-ISSN 1943-3999
Copyright ©2017 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.


Impact of Airline Top Management Teams on Corporate Social Responsibility

Won Seok Lee,* Chulwon Kim,† Joonho Moon,‡ and Hyejin Yoon†

*Department of Tourism and Recreation, Kyonggi University, Suwon, South Korea
†Department of Convention Management, Kyung Hee University, Seoul, South Korea
‡Department of Tourism Administration, Kangwon National University, Chooncheon, South Korea

The purpose of this article is to examine the determinants of corporate social responsibility (CSR) in the airline industry by applying the conceptual framework of upper echelon theory. Based on this theory, certain attributes of managers—such as age, tenure, formal education level, share ownership, and stock options—are hypothesized to have an impact on CSR decisions. Furthermore, rather than considering only the chief executive officer’s characteristics, the entire top management team (TMT) is taken into account to draw more robust conclusions. Data are collected from 13 publicly traded airlines in the US stock market from 1998 to 2013 and analyzed by panel feasible generalized squares. Based on the findings, the TMT’s average age and the value of stock options held by the TMT are key in accounting for CSR decisions. The age of the TMT positively affects the airlines’ CSR, whereas the value of stock options has a negative impact on CSR.

Key words: Corporate social responsibility (CSR); Stakeholder theory; Upper echelon theory; Airlines

Address correspondence to Joonho Moon, Department of Tourism Administration, Kangwon National University, Hyoja2-Dong, Kangwon University Road, Chooncheon 200-701, South Korea. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Analysis, Vol. 22, pp. 31-43
1083-5423/17 $60.00 +.00
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3727/108354217X
14828625279654
E-ISSN 1943-3999
Copyright ©2017 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.


Spatial Distribution and the Agglomeration Performance of High-Star Hotels

Min Wei

School of Management, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian, P.R. China

The spatial distribution of high-star hotels shows various characteristics and trends of agglomeration performance with the development of the regional tourism economy. This article analyzes the regional distribution of China’s high-star hotels by examining 31 panel data sets for the period from 2000 to 2014 focusing on the power system of tourism development. The improved data envelopment analysis model, which is an efficiency evaluation method of multidecision for multi-input/multioutput, is applied to calculate the agglomeration performance of high-star hotels. The spatial concentration trends, agglomeration performance, and the impact of the mechanisms are further studied with an analysis of Pearson correlation. The results show that the changes in the agglomeration performance of high-star hotels are mainly efficiency driven and that the large-scale performance of high-star hotels exhibits a decreasing trend in most provinces of China. Finally, based on the Boston matrix, measures to improve the agglomeration performance of high-star hotels are proposed.

Key words: High-star hotels; Spatial layout; Agglomeration performance; Data envelopment analysis (DEA)

Address correspondence to Min Wei, School of Management, Xiamen University, No. 422 of the South Siming Road, Xiamen, Fujian, P.R. China. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Analysis, Vol. 22, pp. 45-58
1083-5423/17 $60.00 +.00
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3727/108354217X
14828625279690
E-ISSN 1943-3999
Copyright ©2017 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.


Stakeholders and Craft Beer Tourism Development

Abel Duarte Alonso,*† Nikolaos Sakellarios,‡ and Alessandro Bressan§

*Liverpool Business School, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool, UK
†School of Business and Law, Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, Western Australia, Australia
‡School of Business, University of Derby, Derby, UK
§School of Business, The University of Notre Dame Australia, Chippendale, New South Wales, Australia

The growth of craft brewing in many countries is increasingly documented in the academic literature. However, research on this phenomenon, concerning the tourism side, is still limited. This exploratory study contributes to the developing body of craft brewing research, investigating the potential, opportunities, and challenges of craft beer tourism (CBT) from the perspective of a group of predominantly microbrewers operating in three nations. The significance of these entrepreneurs as stakeholders of this burgeoning industry justifies the use of stakeholder theory (ST) as the study’s theoretical foundation; this adoption represents a further contribution of the study. The usefulness of ST is confirmed, with the findings particularly aligning with the descriptive, instrumental, and normative theses. Additionally, different perceptions of the potential of CBT based on country are identified; content analysis provides further support when different forms of CBT that could be developed are identified. The study also underlines various important practical and theoretical implications and suggests future research opportunities.

Key words: Craft brewing; Craft beer tourism (CBT); Opportunities; Challenges; Stakeholders; Stakeholder theory (ST)

Address correspondence to Abel Duarte Alonso, Liverpool Business School, Liverpool John Moores University, Redmonds Building, Brownlow Hill, Liverpool, L3 5UG, UK. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Analysis, Vol. 22, pp. 59-73
1083-5423/17 $60.00 +.00
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3727/108354217X
14828625279735
E-ISSN 1943-3999
Copyright ©2017 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.


Proenvironmental
Behavior: Critical Link Between Satisfaction and Place Attachment in Australia and Canada

Haywantee Ramkissoon*† and Felix T. Mavondo

*School of Marketing, Curtin Business School, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia
Behaviourworks Australia, Monash Sustainability Institute, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
‡Department of Marketing, Faculty of Business and Economics, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

This study explores issues of scale equivalence and generalizability in national parks. Visitors’ place satisfaction, proenvironmental behavior, and place attachment are measured across two qualitatively distinct populations in Australia and Canada. Techniques employed in this cross-country study bring an important contribution to tourism research. The primary focus is to establish measure equivalence before undertaking hypothesis testing using structural equation modeling on a sample of 339 repeat visitors at the Dandenong Ranges National Park, Australia, and 296 repeat visitors at the Bruce Peninsula National Park, Canada. Results from both samples indicate (a) there is measure equivalence between the Australian and Canadian samples allowing comparability of findings, (b) a positive and significant effect of visitor place satisfaction on proenvironmental behavioral intentions, (c) a significant and positive influence of proenvironmental behavioral intention on place attachment (place identity, place dependence, place social bonding, place affect), and (d) a significant and negative effect of visitor place satisfaction on place social bonding. The main finding relates to the promotion of proenvironmental behaviors among national park users that—in addition to individual benefits—provides environmental sustainability as well as practical benefits for park managers and society.

Key words: Measure invariance; Proenvironmental behavior; Visitor satisfaction; Place attachment; National parks

Address correspondence to Haywantee Ramkissoon, School of Marketing, Curtin Business School, Curtin University, GPO Box U1987, Perth, Western Australia 6845, Australia. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Analysis, Vol. 22, pp. 75-83
1083-5423/17 $60.00 +.00
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3727/108354217X
14828625279771
E-ISSN 1943-3999
Copyright ©2017 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.


Determining Long-Term Change in Tourism Research Language With Text-Mining Methods

Josef A. Mazanec

Department of Tourism and Service Management, MODUL University Vienna, Vienna, Austria

Are quantitative text mining methods sensitive enough to recognize change in the language of tourism research? The study of tourism is expected to have shifted focus during the past four decades, and this must be reflected in the abstracts of articles published in a journal of particularly long tradition. Two text mining methods are employed for analyzing change. They prove to be capable of detecting significant change in language between early and recent article abstracts. The study investigates discriminant word items and latent topic structures. The double approach with two computationally unrelated methods (penalized support vector machines and latent Dirichlet allocation) explores (a) single word items that differentiate between earlier and later article abstracts and (b) the relevance of latent topics underlying older and newer abstracts. The results advocate future qualitative analyses for pursuing the reasons and contents of change.

Key words: Text mining; Abstracts; Latent topics; Support vector machines (SVMs); Latent Dirichlet allocation (LDA)

Address correspondence to Josef A. Mazanec, Department of Tourism and Service Management, MODUL University Vienna, Am Kahlenberg 1, A-1190 Vienna, Austria. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Analysis, Vol. 22, pp. 85-91
1083-5423/17 $60.00 +.00
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3727/108354217X
14828625279816
E-ISSN 1943-3999
Copyright ©2017 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.


RESEARCH NOTE

Ecotourism Participation Intention in Australia: Mediating Influence of Social Interactions

Johra Kayeser Fatima,* Habib Zaman Khan,† and Abdel K. Halabi

*School of Management, Faculty of Business, Government and Law, University of Canberra, Canberra, ACT, Australia
†School of Information Systems and Accounting, Faculty of Business, Government and Law, University of Canberra, ACT, Australia
‡Federation Business School, Federation University Australia, Churchill, Victoria, Australia

This study investigates the mediating role of social interactions between the ecotourism attitude and ecotourism participation intention of tourism students in Australia. It also examines the moderating influence of gender and length of career relationship on social interactions. Data analysis results from partial least squares–based structural equation modeling confirm a positive relationship among environmental knowledge, ecotourism attitude, landscape likability, and ecotourism participation intention. Findings also reveal that the mediating influence is further moderated by gender difference but not by the relationship length of the student’s tourism career. These findings have important implications for tourism education providers in designing sustainability-related learning materials.

Key words: Ecotourism participation; Environmental knowledge; Social interactions; Structural equation modeling (SEM)

Address correspondence to Abdel K. Halabi, Federation Business School, Federation University Australia, Gippsland Campus, Northways Road, Churchill, Victoria 3842, Australia. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Analysis, Vol. 22, pp. 93-98
1083-5423/17 $60.00 +.00
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3727/108354217X
14828625279852
E-ISSN 1943-3999
Copyright ©2017 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.


RESEARCH NOTE

Different Hearth, Different Worth: Sustaining an Emerging Festival in the New Cultural City of Singapore

Sharon Chang* and Renuka Mahadevan†

*National Arts Council, Goodman Arts Centre, Singapore
†School of Economics, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia

This study examines some challenges and draws lessons for a new cultural city promoting an emerging festival. This was done by considering the valuation of the festival and its determinants by foreign tourists, domestic tourists, and potential attenders (a group often ignored in the literature). For a young festival, it was encouraging to find that the festival’s social value to tourists, local attenders, and potential attenders exceeded the entry fee. Overall, the Biennale was more popular with younger people, and local attenders appreciated the educational dimension of the event. This augurs well for the future of this festival. However, for the festival’s sustainability, it is important to strike a balance between catering to preferences of international and local attenders as well as avoid trying to achieve multiple objectives that may lead to a dilution in the focus and identity of the new festival.

Key words: Contingent valuation (CV); Willingness to pay (WTP); Biennale; Festival tourism

Address correspondence to Sharon Chang, National Arts Council, Goodman Arts Centre, 90 Goodman Road, Block A #01-01, Singapore 439053. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Analysis, Vol. 22, pp. 99-103
1083-5423/17 $60.00 +.00
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3727/108354217X
14828625279898
E-ISSN 1943-3999
Copyright ©2017 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.


RESEARCH NOTE

Vacationing at Sea Again: Who and Why?

Renuka Mahadevan

School of Economics, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia

This article analyzes the factors influencing the intention to cruise again, comparing male and female cruisers as well as first-timers and repeat cruisers. A case study on Australian cruisers revealed the need for a targeted marketing approach and some similarities toward a more general advertising effort. Contrary to previous studies, brand loyalty to cruise line is found to be less important than cruise destination. However, men—unlike women—were influenced by a cruise recommended by others and interesting ports of calls, whereas women valued cruise experience over cruise destination. Among first-timers, women were more likely to cruise again; however, to attract repeat cruisers, there needs to be a deeper understanding of preferences underlying a good cruise experience.

Key words: First-timers; Repeat cruisers; Gender; Ordered probit regression

Address correspondence to Renuka Mahadevan, School of Economics, The University of Queensland, Level 6, Colin Clark Building (39), Brisbane, Queensland 4072, Australia. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Analysis, Vol. 22, pp. 105-111
1083-5423/17 $60.00 +.00
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3727/108354217X
14828625279933
E-ISSN 1943-3999
Copyright ©2017 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.


RESEARCH NOTE

Visitor Economic Impact Estimates of Garrett County, Maryland

Jinyang Deng,* Kat hryn GAZAL,† and Steven Selin*

*Recreation, Parks, & Tourism Resources Program, School of Natural Resources, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV, USA
†Forest Resources Management Program, School of Natural Resources, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV, USA

It is a major challenge to estimate the total visitation of a destination without gate counts. This study proposes a modified ratio-based approach by which the visitor number and visitor volume at a county level (Garrett County, MD) are estimated using survey information on the sample percentage of a given visitor type antd the actual documentation of visitor counts of that visitor type. It is estimated that the total person-trips for the county are 1,117,744 during the survey period between August 2008 and July 2009 with an estimated total visitor spending being $243.3 million. Visitor economic impact analyses using IMPLAN indicate that visitors of the county have a total economic impact of $347.7 million in sales. The study shows that the county is quite comparable in terms of the total visitor spending with nearby ski resort counties in West Virginia and also competitive against most other counties in the state.

Key words: Ratio-based approach; Visitor survey; Visitor volume; Visitor spending; Economic impacts

Address correspondence to Jinyang Deng, Recreation, Parks, & Tourism Resources Program, School of Natural Resources, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506, USA. Tel: (304) 293-6818; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it