Journal of Gastronomy 2(3) Abstracts

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Journal of Gastronomy and Tourism, Vol. 2, pp. 153-161
2169-2971/17 $60.00 + .00
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3727/216929717X14870140201035
E-ISSN 2169-298X
Copyright © 2017 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Beer Tourism in Central Kentucky: Identifying On-Site Experience Preferences for Kentucky Brewery Tourists

Michael J. Bradley,* James Maples,† Andy Lewis,‡ and K. Joseph Berend§

*Department of Recreation and Park Administration, Eastern Kentucky University, Richmond, KY, USA
†Department of Sociology, Anthropology, & Social Work, Eastern Kentucky University, Richmond, KY, USA
‡Cooperative Extension, University of Kentucky, Winchester, KY, USA
§Department of Library Public Services, Eastern Kentucky University, Richmond, KY, USA

Craft beer tourism, defined as purposeful travel to experience beer culture, taste beers, or tour facilities, is increasing in the US. Although various regions have seen increased craft beer tourism, there is limited information related to beer tourism in the US. To aid in efforts to understand brewery tourists, this research project solicited motivations for visitation and experience preferences of craft brewery patrons in central Kentucky. Researchers developed a visitor demographic profile, noted preferred experiences while onsite, and highlighted specific motivations for visiting breweries. Although exploratory in nature, this information may help breweries in their programming and marketing efforts to increase brewery visitation and revenue.

Key words: Craft brewery; Brewery tourism; Niche tourism; Regional tourism; Repeat visitation

Address correspondence to Michael J. Bradley, Ph.D., Department of Recreation and Park Administration, Eastern Kentucky University, 401 Begley, 521 Lancaster Avenue, Richmond, KY 40475, USA. Tel: 859.622.1834; Fax: 859.622.2971; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Journal of Gastronomy and Tourism, Vol. 2, pp. 163-172
2169-2971/17 $60.00 + .00
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3727/216929717X14870140201071
E-ISSN 2169-298X
Copyright © 2017 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Gastronomy Attractions in Amish Country: A View of Push and Pull Motivations to Visit

Ramandyal Khanna* and Aviad Israeli†

*College of Education, Health, and Human Services, School of Foundations, Leadership, and Administration, Kent State University, Kent, OH, USA
†Hospitality Management, College and Graduate School of Education, Health, and Human Services, School of Foundations, Leadership, and Administration, Kent State University, Kent, OH, USA

The purpose of this study was to evaluate decisions to visit Amish County (Ohio, USA)—a popular tourist destination with a rich culture and a variety of attractions that include gastronomy and nongastronomy attractions. The study evaluated two main issues: the effects push and pull factors had on customers’ decisions to visit the destination and visitors’ decisions to visit gastronomy attractions in the destination. The findings show that pull factors are more important than push factors in motivating a visit. The analysis also reveals that the preferences to visit gastronomy attractions can be divided to two main groups: the first group included visits to gastronomy attractions that mix culture and gastronomy and consuming food at these attractions. The second group included visits to gastronomy attractions that present food production or information about food. The study provides an interesting view of categories of gastronomy attractions and it concludes with practical suggestions to focus on marketing gastronomy sites by combining culture and gastronomy and by focusing on the experience they offer (e.g., consuming food or learning about food).

Key words: Tourism destinations; Push and pull factors; Amish Country; Amish gastronomy

Address correspondence to Aviad Israeli, Hospitality Management, College and Graduate School of Education, Health, and Human Services, School of Foundations, Leadership, and Administration, Kent State University, PO Box 5190, Kent, OH 44242, USA. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Journal of Gastronomy and Tourism, Vol. 2, pp. 173-187
2169-2971/17 $60.00 + .00
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3727/216929717X114870140201116
E-ISSN 2169-298X
Copyright © 2017 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Experiences With Local Food in a Mature Tourist Destination: The Importance of Consumers’ Motivations

António Almeida* and Brian Garrod

*University of Madeira, Funchal, Portugal
Aberystwyth Business School, Aberystwyth University, Aberystwyth, Wales, UK

This article investigates the role of food in the tourism experience, particularly in destinations that are not famous for their food offer and where the local gastronomy is not a primary motivation for tourist visits. Factorial analysis and cluster analysis were applied to data collected on the food preferences and dining behavior of 392 tourists staying in hotels in Madeira. Although most tourists to Madeira could not be described as “food tourists,” motivations to visit the islands nevertheless overlap with motivations to eat traditional local food once they have arrived. Eating local foods may be either a “peak” experience or a “secondary” experience for tourists, but these roles are not fixed and may be reassigned. The results highlight the need for destination marketing organizations to pay more attention to the link between destination image and food consumption. Well-directed marketing efforts can turn low-value “secondary” experiences of sampling the local cuisine into more high-value “peak” experiences. The study identifies and describes three clusters of tourists based on their level of engagement with local food. Such information can assist destination stakeholders make the most of the Madeira’s unique food offer. This could involve providing the right context for “secondary” food experiences to be transformed into “peak” food experiences. An improved understanding is provided of the actual and potential role of food in directly providing or indirectly supporting the tourism experience, especially in destinations where the local gastronomy is not a primary motivation to visit.

Key words: Local; Traditional; Food; Motivation; Behavior

Address correspondence to Brian GarrodAberystwyth Business School, Aberystwyth University, Llanbadarn Campus, Aberystwyth, SY23 3AL, Wales, UK. Tel: +44 (0) 1970 621638; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Journal of Gastronomy and Tourism, Vol. 2, pp. 189-201
2169-2971/17 $60.00 + .00
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3727/216929717X
14870140201152
E-ISSN 2169-298X
Copyright © 2017 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

A Typology of Travel Blog Narratives About Food and Eating in Peru

Velvet Nelson

Department of Geography and Geology, Sam Houston State University, Huntsville, TX, USA Although the relationship between food and tourism has received greater attention in recent years, few studies focus on tourists’ experiences in emerging food destinations. Travel blogs offer a distinct opportunity to examine tourists’ narratives of these experiences. The research discussed in this article uses a thematic approach to narrative analysis of personal travel blog accounts of food and eating in Peru to gain insight into what tourists are looking for from, and their reactions to, these experiences, as well as what they reveal about themselves in the process. Although Peru is not a traditional gastronomic destination, it has received increased international media attention and awards for its cuisine. The destination was selected as a case study for this research because of the potential to obtain diverse perspectives on food from international tourists ranging from backpackers trekking across the region to luxury tourists traveling to Lima for a long weekend of culture. Forty-five travel blog entries were identified and analyzed, which yielded a typology of narratives regarding food and eating experiences. This included facing challenges, craving the familiar, displaying ambivalence, embracing adventure, and gaining and displaying knowledge. These narratives were often woven throughout a blog entry, so that bloggers displayed different patterns during the course of their trip, depending on the circumstances. Narrative analysis allows greater understanding of these circumstances, with implications for both research and destination stakeholders.

Key words: Food; Narratives; Narrative analysis; Travel blogs; Peru

Address correspondence to Velvet Nelson, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Department of Geography and Geology, Sam Houston State University, Box 2148, Huntsville, TX 77341-2148, USA. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Journal of Gastronomy and Tourism, Vol. 2, pp. 203-216
2169-2971/17 $60.00 + .00
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3727/216929717X14870140201198
E-ISSN 2169-298X
Copyright © 2017 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

A COMPARISON OF FOOD CONTENTS USED BY OFFICIAL TOURISM ORGANIZATIONS’ MOBILE APPLICATIONS

JA YOUNG CHOE,* JEONG HYUN KIM,* AND MI SOOK CHO†

*School of Hotel & Tourism Management, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Kowloon, Hong Kong
†Department of Nutritional Science & Food Management, Ewha Womans University, Seoul, Republic of Korea

Owing to the increase in the use of mobile devices when traveling, the contents of government-run tourism mobile applications (or “apps”) have become a powerful way to promote a destination’s cuisine and food culture. This study explores the cuisine- and gastronomy-related contents of the tourism mobile apps run by the official organizations of Hong Kong, Korea, Taiwan, Thailand, Switzerland, Italy, Scotland, and the Czech Republic. The mobile apps of Hong Kong, Korea, and Scotland can be regarded as user friendly, while the mobile apps of Thailand and Switzerland offer playful moments for the users. Because different types of food tourists may have different approaches and evaluations of mobile apps, tailored approaches should be necessary when developing tourism mobile apps. By examining how official tourism organizations deliver information and then comparing different food tourism marketing strategies used by these mobile apps, this study reveals the strengths and weaknesses of such apps, and provides practical suggestions for further promoting food-related information through this platform.

Key words: Food; Restaurant guide; Smartphone; Content analysis; Mobile app; Comparative study

Address correspondence to Ja Young Choe, Ph.D. student, School of Hotel & Tourism Management, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, 7 Science Museum Rd. TST East, Kowloon, Hong Kong, SAR. Tel: +852 3400-2327; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it