Tourism Review International 21(1) Abstracts

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Tourism Review International, Vol. 21, pp. 3-16
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DOI: https://doi.org/10.3727/154427217X
14858894687432
E-ISSN 1943-4421
Copyright © 2017 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Examining the Effects of Perceived Quality, Value, Satisfaction, and Destination Loyalty in Shiogama, Japan

Kohsuke Matsuoka,* Rob Hallak,† Takatoshi Murayama,* and Atsushi Akiike*

*Tohoku Gakuin University, Miyagi, Japan
†University of South Australia Business School, Adelaide, SA, Australia

This study examines the relationships between perceived quality, value, visitor satisfaction, and loyalty in a new context—Shiogama, Japan—a seaside town with a population of 55,000 residents that is famous for its cultural attractions and attracts over 2 million visitors per annum. Drawing on theories from tourism, marketing, and destination management, we hypothesize that perceived quality of destination attributes, as well perceived value of the experience, will have a direct positive effect on tourist satisfaction. Tourist satisfaction is hypothesized to be a direct driver of loyalty to the destination. The research also examines the extent to which the origin of the domestic tourist moderates the relationships between perceived quality, perceived value, and satisfaction. A research questionnaire was used to collect responses from 436 visitors to Shiogama’s tourist attractions in 2015. Perceived quality was operationalized to capture the unique attributes of Shiogama. Results of the exploratory factor analysis and multiple regression analysis found that the perceived quality of Shiogama’s attributes, including the city’s local restaurants, atmosphere, and souvenirs, have a significant positive effect on visitor satisfaction. Perceived value of the destination, measured through visitors’ perceptions of costs and benefit of the travel experience, was also significantly and positively related to satisfaction. Visitor satisfaction was significantly and positively related to destination loyalty, validating previous research on the predictors of destination loyalty. We found that visitors to Shiogama from different regions of Japan engaged in different activities and attractions, highlighting the heterogeneity of Shiogama’s inbound domestic market segments. The study presents new insights on the operationalization of perceived quality and the predictors of tourist satisfaction and loyalty toward a destination. The findings are also relevant to industry practitioners and destination managers as they seek to understand the heterogeneous needs and behaviors of their inbound market segments.

Key words: Perceived quality; Perceived value; Satisfaction; Loyalty; Multiple regression; Japan

Address correspondence to Rob Hallak, Ph.D., Senior Lecturer, University of South Australia Business School, M3-28 City West Campus, GPO Box 2471, Adelaide, SA 5001, Australia. Tel: +61 8 83020474; Fax: +61 8 83020512; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Review International, Vol. 21, pp. 17-30
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DOI: https://doi.org/10.3727/154427217X
14858894687478
E-ISSN 1943-4421
Copyright © 2017 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Exploring Learning Outcomes of Domestic Travel Experiences Through Mothers’ Voices

Matthew J. Stone* and James F. Petrick

*Department of Recreation, Hospitality, and Parks Management, California State University, Chico, Chico, CA, USA
†Department of Recreation, Park and Tourism Sciences, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, USA

Study abroad and long-term international travel have been shown to result in learning of “generic skills,” like decision making and patience. However, examination of the benefits of domestic travel is scarce. In this exploratory study, women with children were asked to reflect on domestic travel experiences. They all felt that travel was educational, but they had not often reflected on this experiential learning. Learning outcomes from domestic travel included content knowledge, practical knowledge, interpersonal skills, and personal growth, which were similar outcomes as international travel. Many felt their children learned through domestic family travel experiences and that travel is an important supplement to classroom education. Reflection on the learning outcomes of travel helped individuals to realize that their personal travel had been educative, supporting the applicability of Kolb’s experiential learning model to travel. It is recommended that travel providers and educators encourage travelers to reflect on what they learned while traveling. A process model is presented that travel may lead to learning and that this learning may encourage travel. 

Key words: Experiential learning; Travel learning; Educational travel; Family travel; Travel benefits

Address correspondence to Matthew J. Stone, Department of Recreation, Hospitality, and Parks Management, California State University, Chico, 400 West First Street, Chico, CA, 95929-0560, USA. Tel: +1 530-898-4051; Fax: +1 530-898-6557; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Review International, Vol. 21, pp. 31-47
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DOI: https://doi.org/10.3727/154427217X
14858894687513
E-ISSN 1943-4421
Copyright © 2017 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Tourists’ Psychological Connection to Pop Culture Tourism: A Perspective of Psychological Continuum Model

Seojin Lee,* Woojin Lee,* and Hyeong-Yeon Jeon†

*School of Community Resources and Development, Arizona State University, Phoenix, AZ, USA
†Department of Media Communication Sciences, Konkuk University, Seoul, Republic of Korea

This study analyzes tourists’ psychological connection to pop culture tourism. Based on the psychological continuum model (PCM), the article identifies three different tourist groups in terms of awareness, attraction/attachment and allegiance, and employs statistical analysis of tourist experiences, based on a survey of Chinese tourists who visited South Korea. The major findings suggest that tourist experiences vary significantly, depending on the tourists’ levels of psychological connection to pop culture. Specifically, three segments have different characteristics, and tourists behave differently regarding these characteristics: reasons for travel, media uses for Korean pop culture, tourists’ value fulfillment (utilitarian and hedonic value), and commitment to a destination (attitude and loyalty). The results provide a clear empirical foundation that the concept of “psychological involvement” in leisure is relevant to tourists’ participation in pop culture tourism. One important practical implication from this study for strategic marketing is that in predicting tourist behaviors one should recognize the subgroups of visitors according to psychological segmentation connected to pop culture.

Key words: Pop culture tourism; Segmentation; Fan; Psychological continuum model (PCM); Tourism experience

Address correspondence to Seojin Lee, Ph.D. Student, School of Community Resources and Development, Arizona State University, 411 N Central Ave, Phoenix, AZ 85004, USA. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Review International, Vol. 21, pp. 49-61
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DOI: https://doi.org/10.3727/154427217X
14858894687559
E-ISSN 1943-4421
Copyright © 2017 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Managing Tourism Firms in South Africa for Competitiveness: An Innovation Perspective

Irma Booyens*† and Christian M. Rogerson*

*School of Tourism & Hospitality, Faculty of Management, University of Johannesburg, Johannesburg, South Africa
†Economic Performance and Development, Human Sciences Research Council, Cape Town, South Africa

Innovation is regarded as significant for the competitiveness of tourism firms. Yet, innovation in services, and also tourism, remain underresearched, especially in the context of the global South. This article draws on a cross-sectoral, firm-level survey of tourism innovation in the Western Cape region of South Africa, which determined that innovation by tourism firms is widespread, albeit predominantly incremental in character. This article interrogates the relationships between innovation and firm survival, as a proxy for competitiveness, and considers firm size as a key determinant of tourism innovation. In addition, the motivators and drivers of tourism innovation are analyzed. The Western Cape investigation reveals that innovation is part of a deliberate strategy for competitiveness by dynamic tourism firms. Further motivations comprise enhancing efficiency and productivity, ensuring survival, and behaving ethically.

Key words: Tourism innovation; Tourism competitiveness; Innovation orientation; Innovation determinants

Address correspondence to Dr. Irma Booyens, Economic Performance and Development, Human Sciences Research Council, Private Bag X9182, Cape Town 8000, South Africa. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Review International, Vol. 21, pp. 63-80
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DOI: https://doi.org/10.3727/154427217X
14866652018901
E-ISSN 1943-4421
Copyright © 2017 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

A Quantitative Methodology for Assessing Sustainable Tourism Potentials

Matthew Biniyam Kursah

Department of Geography Education, University of Education Winneba (UEW), Winneba, Ghana

Sustainable tourism potential is the measure of the ability and opportunity of material and nonmaterial elements to attract tourists to a destination that takes full account of its current and future socioeconomic and environmental impacts, while addressing the needs of visitors, the industry, the environment, and the host communities. Thus, an effective way to developing sustainable tourism is a better identification of tourism potentials of different areas for accurate planning. Using a quantitative approach, this study identified the
pull and push factors in assessing tourism potentials in Ghana, normalized the factors using scaled-item model and weight system assigned by tourists. It also acquired availability scores for each factor in five Municipal and District Assemblies (MDAs) in Ghana and used this to show the application of the model. The final output is the tourism potential index (TPI), which could be used for assessing sustainable tourism development at the micro and the macrolevels. The article concludes with a ranking of the selected MDAs according to their tourism potentials and substantiation of the scaled-item model to be implemented to ensure a sustainable tourism development of the MDAs. For the pull factors, the Effutu municipality with an index of 4.44 is ranked highest, followed in that order by Gomoa West district (4.26), Agona West municipality (4.00), Ajumako-Enyan-Essiam district (3.98), and Gomoa East district (3.9). For the TPI, which included the pull and the push factors, the Effutu municipality is still ranked highest with an index of 3.20. This is followed, in that order, by Gomoa West district (2.99), Ajumako-EnyanEssiam (2.63), Gomoa East (2.59), and Agona West municipality (2.02), which lost the third position for the least position. Effutu municipality (3.20) with the highest TPI is 1.18 higher than the Agona West municipality (2.02) with the least TPI. It is suggested that examining the tourism potentials of areas based on the pull factors or attraction sites/facilities alone is inadequate as the tourism industry involves other sectors and push factors such as security and safety, socioeconomic, environment, and natural resources.

Key words: Destination preferences; Scaled-item model; Sustainable tourism; Tourist motivation; Tourism potential; Tourism potential index (TPI)

Address correspondence to Matthew B. Kursah, Lecturer, Department of Geography Education, University of Education Winneba (UEW), Box 25, Winneba, Ghana. Tel: +233 2434 359 29; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it or This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Review International, Vol. 21, pp. 81-98
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DOI: https://doi.org/10.3727/154427217X
14866652018947
E-ISSN 1943-4421
Copyright © 2017 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Benefits and Challenges of Community-Based Ecotourism in Park-Fringe Communities: The Case of
Mesomagor of Kakum National Park, Ghana

Ishmael Mensah

Department of Hospitality and Tourism Management, University of Cape Coast, Cape Coast, Ghana

Community-based ecotourism (CBE) is seen as a viable model for achieving conservation and improved livelihoods for park-fringe communities. In view of that, many communities in Ghana, including
Mesomagor, have embraced the concept. Yet, most studies have employed quantitative methods and failed to examine the challenges of community participation in ecotourism development. Therefore, this study employed qualitative methods to analyze the benefits and challenges of CBE in the Mesomagor community of the Kakum National Park. This involved key informant interviews of 15 stakeholders using a semistructured interview guide. The results of the study show that though the community had made some modest economic gains, especially in infrastructural development, the project was confronted with a number of challenges including apathy towards participation, limited employment and revenue-sharing opportunities, lack of local capacity to manage the project, and destruction of farms by stray elephants from the park.

Key words: Community-based ecotourism (CBE); Community; Revenue sharing; Kakum National Park (KNP); Ghana

Address correspondence to Ishmael Mensah, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Department of Hospitality and Tourism Management, University of Cape Coast, Cape Coast, Ghana. Tel: +233243134578; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it