Event Management 21(2) Abstracts

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Event Management, Vol. 21, pp. 139–158
1525-9951/17 $60.00 + .00
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3727/152599517X
14878772869568
E-ISSN 1943-4308
Copyright ©2017 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Sport Participation Legacy and the Olympic Games: The Case of Sydney 2000, London 2012, and Rio 2016

Arianne Carvalhedo Reis,*† Stephen Frawley,‡ Danya Hodgetts,§ Alana Thomson,¶ And Kate Hughes#

*School of Science and Health, Western Sydney University, Campbelltown, NSW, Australia
†School of Business and Tourism, Southern Cross University, Coffs Harbour, Australia
‡Australian Centre for Olympic Studies, University of Technology Sydney, Lindfield, NSW, Australia
§Physical Activity Research Group, School of Human Health and Social Services, Central Queensland University, North Rockhampton, QLD, Australia
¶Department of Tourism, Sport and Hotel Management, Griffith University, QLD, Australia
#Carnegie Faculty of Sport and Education, Leeds Metropolitan University, Leeds, UK

Sport participation as a legacy of the Olympic Games (OG) has frequently featured as a component of the “legacy package” that government bodies and organizing committees promote to the local communities to gain support for the hosting of these mega-events. However, only recently increased sport participation has been explicitly included as part of a legacy plan in OG candidature files. This article examines the changes and development of sport legacy planning and implementation from Sydney 2000, London 2012, and Rio 2016. The three case studies confirm that sport participation legacies are only achieved if host governments engage the community, develop long-term strategies, and coordinate efforts between different government portfolios and with a range of relevant stakeholders. So far, there is limited evidence available to demonstrate that relevant government bodies have attempted to strategically leverage the Games with the purpose of developing a sport participation legacy for the wider population.

Key words: Sport participation; Mega-events; Legacy; Physical activity

Address correspondence to Arianne Carvalhedo Reis, Ph.D., School of Science and Health, Western Sydney University, Narellen Road, Campbelltown NSW 2560, Australia. Tel: +61 2 4620 3136; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it  or Stephen Frawley, Ph.D., Australian Centre for Olympic Studies, University of Technology Sydney, 100 Eton Road, Lindfield NSW 2070, Australia. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Event Management, Vol. 21, pp. 159–174
1525-9951/17 $60.00 + .00
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3727/152599517X
14878772869720
E-ISSN 1943-4308
Copyright ©2017 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Health-Related Attitudes and Behaviors Among Olympic Host City Residents From Atlanta, Sydney, Athens, and Beijing Olympic Games: Exploring Potential Legacies

Kyriaki Kaplanidou

Department of Tourism, Recreation and Sport Management, College of Health and Human Performance, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA

The potential power of the Olympic Games as an intervention that influences changes in health, sport participation, and exercise has been discussed in the literature as a legacy outcome. However, a temporal evaluation of health-related attitudes and behaviors has not been presented in the literature. The purpose of this study was to explore residents’ health attitudes and behaviors, and further examine those constructs temporally (i.e., since the time from the conclusion of an Olympic Games). Data were collected in 2010 from convenience samples of Olympic Games host city residents in: Atlanta, Sydney, Athens, and Beijing. ANCOVA was used to analyze data among residents from each host city. Beijing residents held more positive attitudes and behaviors toward health-related issues, while the covariates of age and importance of physical spaces for physical activity and recreation significantly influenced health-related attitudes and behaviors across all cities at the time of measurement, which varied from 2 to 14 years for each sample since the conclusion of the Games. Implications for health legacy planning are provided.

Key words: Olympic Games; Legacy; Attitudes; Health; Residents

Address correspondence to Kyriaki Kaplanidou, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Department of Tourism, Recreation and Sport Management, College of Health and Human Performance, University of Florida, PO Box 118208, Gainesville, FL, 32611-8208, USA. Tel: 352-294-1668; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Event Management, Vol. 21, pp. 175–184
1525-9951/17 $60.00 + .00
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3727/152599517X
14878772869603
E-ISSN 1943-4308
Copyright ©2017 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Leveraging Charity Sport Events to Develop a Connection to a Cause

Adam Goodwin,* Ryan Snelgrove,† Laura Wood,† and Marijke Taks

*Human Kinetics, University of Windsor, Windsor, ON, Canada
†Department of Recreation & Leisure Studies, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada
‡School of Human Kinetics, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada

Charity sport events can be strategically leveraged to provide benefits beyond the event itself. This study explores how charity sport events can be leveraged as an opportunity for nonprofit organizations to stimulate participants’ interest in their other cause-related activities. Specifically, the relationships between motives for participation and future intentions to engage in additional cause-related activities are examined. Questionnaires were used to collect data at three separate and uniquely themed running events in support of charities tied to Alzheimer’s disease, anaphylaxis, and mental health. Results from the multiple regression analysis highlight the predictive importance of cause, social, and event theme as predictors of future intentions. The physical aspect of the event was an important factor in attracting participants to the event but not predictive of future intentions to engage in additional charity-related activities.

Key words: Charity sport events; Leveraging; Motivation

Address correspondence to Ryan Snelgrove, Assistant Professor, Department of Recreation & Leisure Studies, University of Waterloo, 200 University Ave W., Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1, Canada. Tel: (519) 888-4567; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Event Management, Vol. 21, pp. 185–199
1525-9951/17 $60.00 + .00
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3727/152599517X
14878772869649
E-ISSN 1943-4308
Copyright ©2017 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Creating Public Value Through Parasport Events

Gayle McPherson,* Laura Misener,† David McGillivray,* and David Legg‡

*School of Media, Culture and Society, University of the West of Scotland, Paisley, Scotland
†School of Kinesiology, Western University, London, Ontario, Canada
‡Department of Physical Education and Recreation Studies, Mount Royal University, Calgary, Alberta, Canada

The hosting of major events presents an opportunity to shape public policy and potentially enable social change. In this article we discuss two different parasport events, the 2014 Glasgow Commonwealth Games and the 2015 Toronto Pan Am/Parapan American Games, which espoused a philosophy of social inclusion and creating social change in sport for persons with disabilities as an outcome of the events. We contend that, as in wider policies for sport, social inclusion has been more illusory than real, sometimes based on increases in facility usage rather than necessarily developing a broader base of participation. Such outcomes stand in contrast to Bozeman and Johnson’s criteria for public value. We argue that the two parasport events were used by policy makers to demonstrate meaningful avenues to social inclusion, social change, and how those in public policy positions have the power to influence and create potential. We examine key policies and policy decision-maker’s perspectives, utilizing Bozeman’s theory on progressive opportunity, regarding the value of two major parasport events in creating social change for persons with disabilities. We conclude that Bozeman’s model of progressive opportunity allows for a more sustainable model for bringing the interests of the market and government agencies together to lead to foreseeable and sustainable social change. Notwithstanding, a clear understanding that policy makers need to realize that structural and societal change will not necessarily happen during the life cycle of Games time.

Key words: Public value; Parasport events; Progressive opportunity; Disability; Public policy; Mega-events

Address correspondence to Gayle McPherson, Professor, School of Media, Culture and Society, University of the West of Scotland, High St, Paisley, PA1 2BE, Scotland. Tel: 0044 141 8483233; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Event Management, Vol. 21, pp. 201–216
1525-9951/17 $60.00 + .00
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3727/152599517X
14878772869685
E-ISSN 1943-4308
Copyright ©2017 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Service Quality and Value Perceptions of the 2014 FIFA World Cup in Brazil

Rui Biscaia,* Abel Correia,† Thiago Santos,‡ Stephen Ross,§ and Masayuki Yoshida¶

*School of Marketing and Management, Coventry University, Coventry, UK
Faculdade de Motricidade Humana, Universidade de Lisboa, Lisbon, Portugal
‡Post-graduate Program in Physical Education, Universidade Federal do Parana, Curitiba, Brazil
§School of Kinesiology and Health Sciences—Sport Management, Concordia University, St Paul, MN, USA
¶Faculty of Sports & Health Studies, Hosei University, Tokyo, Japan

This study examines the relationships between service quality and value perceptions of the 2014 FIFA World Cup in Brazil, controlling for the consumers’ opinion about hosting the event in the country. Data were collected from five cities (n = 3,042), and the results from a structural model indicate that teams, accessibilities, and event atmosphere have a positive influence on hedonic value and utilitarian value, while referees only have a positive impact on hedonic value. In turn, crowd experience has a negative effect on both hedonic and utilitarian value. Additionally, consumers’ favorable opinion about hosting the event showed a positive effect on both hedonic and utilitarian value. These findings suggest the need for an appealing ambiance and crowd vigilance to enhance the event’s value. In addition, the more people agree with hosting the event in Brazil the greater the value perception, highlighting the importance of explaining the event benefits to the host community.

Key words: Service quality; Value; Major sport events; Soccer; FIFA World Cup

Address correspondence to Rui Biscaia, School of Marketing and Management, Faculty of Business and Law, Coventry University, Priory Street, CV1 5FB Coventry, UK. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Event Management, Vol. 21, pp. 217–231
1525-9951/17 $60.00 + .00
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3727/152599517X
14878772869766
E-ISSN 1943-4308
Copyright ©2017 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Leveraging Sport Events to Maximize Community Benefits in Low- and Middle-Income Countries

Nico Schulenkorf and Katie Schlenker

University of Technology Sydney, Ultimo, NSW, Australia

For many years, special events have played an important role as strategic elements within community development. However, to date little work has been conducted on how to maximize the social potential of special events in low- and middle-income countries. In addressing this issue, we reflect on event management processes and leverage mechanisms that have underpinned a community sport event in the Pacific Island nation of Sāmoa, and identify strategies for maximizing beneficial event outcomes. We present findings related to previously identified leverage areas, including sociocultural and participatory leverage, and also suggest new areas that seem particularly relevant in the context of community development, including educational, health-related, and reputational leverage. Finally, key challenges and opportunities for event managers and local communities are discussed, implications for event leverage are provided, and areas for future research are outlined.

Key words: Special events; Sport event leverage; Community development; Pacific Islands; Sāmoa

Address correspondence to Nico Schulenkorf, Business School, Sport Management, University of Technology Sydney,14 Ultimo Road, Ultimo 2007, NSW, Australia. Tel: +61 2 9514 5368; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it