Tourism Culture & Communication 17(2) Abstracts

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Tourism, Culture & Communication, Vol. 17, pp. 79-91
1098-304X/17 $60.00 + .00
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3727/109830417X
14966810027526
E-ISSN 1943-4146
Copyright © 2017 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved
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Destination Encounters With Local Food: The Experience of International Visitors in Indonesia

Serli Wijaya,* Brian King,† Alison Morrison,‡ and Thu-Huong Nguyen§

*Faculty of Economics, Petra Christian University Surabaya, Indonesia
†School of Hotel & Tourism Management, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong, China
‡College of Eminent Professors, William Angliss Institute, Melbourne, Australia
§College of Business, Victoria University, Melbourne, Australia

Increasing numbers of visitors are seeking out culinary experiences when travelling overseas. Food can enhance the destination experience, giving physiological sustenance and providing opportunities to learn about destination cultures through direct encounters with local cuisines. However, engaging with novel local food might arouse certain visitor expectations, particularly among those who have not visited previously. This study aimed to identify international visitor preconceptions of local Indonesian food and the underlying factors influencing expectations prior to their in-country experience of dining on local food. A questionnaire-based survey that was administered to 349 international visitors identified seven factors underlying their expectations: staff quality, sensory attributes, food uniqueness, local servicescapes, food authenticity, food familiarity, and food variety. A number of significantly different dining expectations were also highlighted between first-time and repeat visitors.

Key words: Culinary tourism; Dining expectation; International visitors; Local Indonesian food

Address correspondence to Serli Wijaya, Faculty of Economics, Petra Christian University, Jalan Siwalankerto 121-131, Surabaya, East Java 60254 Indonesia. Tel: +62 31 2983084; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism, Culture & Communication, Vol. 17, pp. 93-105
1098-304X/17 $60.00 + .00
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3727/109830417X
14966810027544
E-ISSN 1943-4146
Copyright © 2017 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved
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Neither Here nor There? The Transformation of Place, Performance, People, and Power Relations Through Travelers’ Social Web

Andrew Duffy

Wee Kim Wee School of Communication and Information Nanyang Technological University, Singapore

Smartphones and the social web provide innovative ways to connect, notably in the tourism context. Anecdotes abound of backpackers absorbed in their smartphones or lurking in coffee shops on laptops. It remains unclear whether such preoccupation with the social web, which provides connection with home and with fellow travelers, is beneficial or detrimental to engagement with local people and places. Starting from Gergen’s idea of “absent presence,” this article examines the recent literature on travelers’ use of the social web accessed on smartphones and identifies four distinct but interrelated themes: how smartphones might alter traveler place engagements, their performances while traveling and those who are affected; and finally the implicit power relations in smartphone-enhanced or -encumbered travel. The researchers propose future directions, particularly around the neglected area of interactions between smartphone-bearing travelers and locals.

Key words: Travel; Social media; Absent presence; Cultural studies; Host–guest interaction; Smartphones

Address correspondence to Andrew Duffy, Assistant Professor, Wee Kim Wee School of Communication and Information, Nanyang Technological University, 31 Nanyang Link, Singapore 637718. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism, Culture & Communication, Vol. 17, pp. 107-117
1098-304X/17 $60.00 + .00
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3727/109830417X
14966810027553
E-ISSN 1943-4146
Copyright © 2017 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved
.

A Case of “Disneyization”? The Cheung Chau Bun Festival, Hong Kong

Lee Hiu Yan

Department of Geography, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong

The Bun Festival is an important cultural event on Cheung Chau, an outlying island in Hong Kong, best known for its “bun snatching” competition, in which competitors scramble up bamboo towers covered with steamed buns, vying to retrieve the greatest number of buns within a time limit. Originating as a traditional Taoist ritual, the Festival has recently emerged as a popular tourism event. This article explores the evolutionary process of the Festival from a local folk religious practice into a themed event. The researchers discuss the perceptions of visitors and residents towards the changing Festival, and their concerns about development. Applying Bryman’s four trends of “Disneyization,” it is observed that the contemporary Bun Festival has parallels with the development and marketing of the various Disney parks. In addition to socioeconomic problems associated with the huge influx of tourists on this normally tranquil island, the article proposes that transformation into a tourism spectacle has caused the loss of the event’s uniqueness and threatens its cultural authenticity.

Key words: Cultural heritage tourism; Disneyization; Bun festival; Cheung Chau; Hong Kong

Address correspondence to Lee Hiu Yan, Department of Geography, The University of Hong Kong, Room 1023, 10th Floor, The Jockey Club Tower, Centennial Campus, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism, Culture & Communication, Vol. 17, pp. 119-129
1098-304X/17 $60.00 + .00
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3727/109830417X
14966810027562
E-ISSN 1943-4146
Copyright © 2017 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved
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Intention to Attend the Rainforest World Music Festival: Local Visitor Perspectives

Hiram Ting,* Mary Wan Mering,† Shahren Ahmad Zaidi Adruce,* and Mumtaz Ali Memon

*Sarawak Research Society, Kuching, Sarawak, Malaysia
†Corporate Service Department, Sarawak Tourism Board, Kuching, Sarawak, Malaysia
‡Centre of Social Innovation, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Perak, Malaysia

The annual Rainforest World Music Festival in Sarawak, Malaysia is a much celebrated tourism event and has global awareness as a festival of world music. Notwithstanding the popularity of the festival, there has been no study of visitor intentions. Drawing upon the theory of planned behavior, this study aims to determine the effect of attitude, subjective norm, perceived behavioral control, and past experience on behavioral intentions to attend the festival from the local visitor perspective. A questionnaire-based survey was administered using purposive sampling and ultimately 241 respondents participated. Multiple regressions analysis and t test were used to perform tests of relationship and difference. The findings show that although all the factors that are of interest have positive effects on intentions to visit the Festival, local visitors who have and have not attended previously exhibit very different behaviors. The study provides insights for the benefit of festival organizers and relevant stakeholders within the wider context of music festivals.

Key words: Rainforest World Music Festival (RWMF); Intention; Tourism; Theory of planned behavior (TPB); Sarawak

Address correspondence to Hiram Ting, Sarawak Research Society, Kuching, Sarawak, Malaysia. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism, Culture & Communication, Vol. 17, pp. 131-136
1098-304X/17 $60.00 + .00
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3727/109830417X
14966810027571
E-ISSN 1943-4146
Copyright © 2017 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved
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Research Note

Indigenous Self-Determination and the Culinary Tourist

Ann Allen

School of Hospitality and Tourism, Auckland University of Technology, Auckland, New Zealand

Some contrasting views exist about the prospective benefits of contemporary food tourism for indigenous communities. Some commentators view food tourism as a potential mechanism for reducing tourist stereotyping, bias, and negative images. Increased economic opportunities, employment, and development are commonly cited as potential benefits. However, critics have viewed these same experiences as a colonial revival. An unquestioned assumption that the food traditions, dishes, and cuisines of (usually economically and culturally marginal) indigenous populations should be available and presented for consumption evokes the colonial legacy. These colonial type assumptions, images, and experiences are being challenged deliberately and in a targeted manner. An increasing number of indigenous communities, including the New Zealand Māori, have chosen to rearticulate and re-present their culture in the context of the postcolonial period. For contemporary indigenous people, the culinary cultural field is often wider than simply supplying the touristically “exotic” or “authentic.” It may provide a location to engage with various strategies for indigenous self-determination and the reappropriation of cultural capital. Such strategies may lead to outcomes catering to culinary tourist demands. Tourists seeking out Māori food will have difficultly gaining access, except in the case of the Wharekai (the Māori social space and part of the Marae meeting complex). This research note considers the relationship between the postcolonial legacy, culinary tourism, and indigenous self-determination, as it applies to first nation peoples’ foodways, and specifically to the Māori. In doing so, it may contribute to developing new perspectives on food tourism and indigenous self-determination.

Key words: Postcolonial; Self-determination; Indigeneity; Reappropriation; Food tourism

Address correspondence to Ann Allen, School of Hospitality and Tourism, Auckland University of Technology, 42 Mozeley Avenue, Devonport, Auckland, New Zealand, 0624. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism, Culture & Communication, Vol. 17, pp. 139-158
1098-304X/17 $60.00 + .00
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3727/109830417X
14966810027580
E-ISSN 1943-4146
Copyright © 2017 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved
.

Critical Review

Transformational Host Communities: Justice Tourism and the Water Regime in Palestine

Rami K. Isaac

Academy for Tourism, NHTV, Breda University of Applied Sciences, Breda, The Netherlands
Faculty of Hospitality and Tourism, Bethlehem University, Bethlehem, Palestine

In this article, Isaac argues that since 1948, Israel’s control of water resources has been the result of military actions that forced between 700,000 and 800,000 Palestinians into exile and claimed the most fertile part of the disputed territory for the state. It thereby paved the way for subsequent military occupation. Isaac maintains that the Israeli occupation has violated the Palestinian right to the equitable and reasonable utilization of shared water resources. In his view, from the end of the 1967 war, Israel initiated its occupation of the territories of Palestine and quickly imposed military order with a view to achieving full control over land and water resources. To Isaac, these military orders served to dissolve the pre-1967 legal systems and which consisted of Ottoman, British, Jordanian (West Bank) and Egyptian (Gaza Strip) laws. This critical review article concentrates on the concept of justice tourism as a response to these assumed Israeli violations of Palestinian rights to equitable and reasonable utilization of shared water resources. The article sheds light on why and how justice tourism conceivably contributes to the Palestine host communities’ transformation and hence to the development of higher level self-consciousness about their rights as “a sovereign nation.” (Abstract by the Reviews Editor)

Key words: Palestine; Justice tourism; Water; Transformations; The agora; Ambassador tourism

Address correspondence to Rami Isaac, NHTV, Breda University of Applied Sciences, Breda, The Netherlands. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it