Tourism Review International 21(3) Abstracts

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Tourism Review International, Vol. 21, pp. 223-239
1544-2721/17 $60.00 + .00
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3727/154427217X
15022104437701
E-ISSN 1943-4421
Copyright © 2017 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Travel and Insight on the Limen: A Content Analysis of Adventure Travel Narratives

Jasmine M. Goodnow* and Samit Bordoloi

*Department of Health and Human Development, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA, USA
Woodring College of Education, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA, USA

Travel narratives, both historical and modern, depict a hero’s quest for insight and self-discovery where the outward journey is a literal and metaphorical search for one’s authentic self, spirituality, and life’s meaning. This article reports the results of a study that examined the association between travel’s liminal experience and insight. Using content analysis of 50 published adventure travel narratives, a significant association between insight and liminality was identified, and the tentative conclusion that liminal experience may be a stimulus for insight was made. Variables (solo/group travel, travel motivation, gender, and cultural novelty) hypothesized to moderate the association between liminality and insight were also explored. Hierarchical log linear modeling identified only one significant three-way association: travel motive. Travelers who sought to escape negative associations with home were less likely to experience liminality and insight than those who were motivated to travel for other reasons.

Key words: Liminality; Insight; Travel narrative; Content analysis

Address correspondence to Jasmine Goodnow, Assistant Professor of Recreation/Tourism, Department of Health and Human Development, Western Washington University, Bond Hall 418C, MS 9067, 516 High Street, Bellingham, WA 98225, USA. Tel: +1-540-352-2367; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Review International, Vol. 21, pp. 241-254
1544-2721/17 $60.00 + .00
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3727/154427217X
15022104437729
E-ISSN 1943-4421
Copyright © 2017 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Perceived Resource Quality as a Framework to Analyze Impacts of Climate Change on Adventure Tourism: Snow, Surf, Wind, and Whitewater

Ralf Buckley

International Chair in Ecotourism Research, Griffith University, Gold Coast, Australia

Surf, snow, wind, and whitewater provide natural resources for adventure tourism. Both the resources themselves, and access for tourism, are dependent on weather and hence are affected by climate change. For some adventure tourism subsectors (e.g., skiing and snowboarding) the industry has already responded to climate change, along with other pressures, by changing its geography and business models. In most subsectors, commercial tour operators perceive themselves as affected by short-term extreme weather events, and climate change models are not yet precise enough to predict how these will change over the short time horizons of tourism business planning. Some particular subsectors, however, can provide early warning indicators of industry responses to climate change. These include: heliskiing and heliboarding; professional big-wave surfing; and whitewater rafting and kayaking on snow melt, monsoon rainfall, or dam-release water flows. These responses may be detected through multiparameter models of visitor numbers and the geography of preferred sites or, more immediately, from the perceptions of commercial tourism operators involved in these subsectors.

Key words: Adventure tourism; Climate change; Impacts; Resource quality; Snow; Surf; Wind; Whitewater

Address correspondence to Ralf Buckley, International Chair in Ecotourism Research, Griffith University, Gold Coast, Australia. Tel: +61755528675; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it  or This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Review International, Vol. 21, pp. 255-273
1544-2721/17 $60.00 + .00
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3727/154427217X
15022104437738
E-ISSN 1943-4421
Copyright © 2017 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Trail Accreditation as a Mechanism to Enhance Hikers’ Confidence During Decision-Making

Liandi Slabbert* and Elizabeth Ann Du Preez

*Tourism Development and Marketing Division, South African National Parks, Pretoria, South Africa
†Division of Tourism Management, Department of Marketing Management, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa

Though regarded as a “soft” adventure activity, the growing popularity of hiking has led to increased documentation of associated risks and unfortunate incidents. Various systems are being used to facilitate adequate trail management to prevent risks, and information provision through accreditation systems provides a means to manage risk perceptions. However, little research has been done on the influence of accreditation systems on consumers’ decision-making and buying behavior within the adventure tourism context. This study took a quantitative approach to measure the importance of and future intended response towards trail accreditation among a sample of 926 hiking tourists in South Africa. A hypothetical country-wide implementation of a case study accreditation system was presented to respondents. The study indicates safety-related information as one of the key components of an accreditation system. It also demonstrates a link between trustworthy information, accreditation, and future hiking participation through addressing perceptions of risk.

Key words: Hiking; Adventure tourism; Trail accreditation; Risk perception

Address correspondence to Dr. Elizabeth Ann Du Preez, Division of Tourism Management, Department of Marketing Management, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Review International, Vol. 21, pp. 275-306
1544-2721/17 $60.00 + .00
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3727/154427217X
15022104437747
E-ISSN 1943-4421
Copyright © 2017 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Examining the Behavioral Intentions of Bungee Jumping Tourists at the Macau Tower: A Quantitative Analysis Using Structural Equation Modeling

Hung-Che Wu,* Ching-Chan Cheng,† and Yi-Chang Chen‡

*Business School, Nanfang College of Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou City, China
†Department of Food and Beverage Management, Taipei University of Marine Technology, Taipei City, Taiwan
‡Accounting School, Nanfang College of Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou City, China

This study aims to examine the structural relationships among experiential quality, perceived authenticity, novelty seeking, experiential satisfaction, and behavioral intentions using a multidimensional and hierarchical model. The findings of this study are based on structural equation modeling (SEM) analysis of a convenience sampling of 410 tourists completing experiencing bungee jumping at the Macau Tower. The results indicate that the model proposed by this study fits the data. The analysis results contribute to the services marketing theory by providing additional insights into experiential quality, perceived authenticity, novelty seeking, experiential satisfaction, behavioral intentions, and the dimensions of experiential quality.

Key words: Experiential quality; Experiential satisfaction; Behavioral intentions; Dimensions of experiential quality

Address correspondence to Dr. Hung-Che Wu, Ph.D., Business School, Nanfang College of Sun Yat-sen University, No. 882 Wenquan Road, Wenquan Town, Conghua District, Guangzhou City, Guangdong Province, China 510970. Tel: + (86) 13533567158; Fax: + (86) 2061787368; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Review International, Vol. 21, pp. 307-316
1544-2721/17 $60.00 + .00
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3727/154427217X
15022104437756
E-ISSN 1943-4421
Copyright © 2017 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

An Ecological Dynamics Perspective on Adventure Tourism

Suzanne Peacock,* Eric Brymer,* Keith Davids,† and Michelle Dillon*

*Carnegie School of Sport, Leeds Beckett University, Leeds, UK
†Centre for Sports Engineering Research, Sheffield Hallam University, Sheffield, UK

Traditional definitions for adventure tourism have focused on the adventure tourism activity or the adventure tourism environment. In these cases the activity is most often associated with risk and the environment associated with unfamiliarity and natural terrains. Critiques of these definitions have pointed out that this traditional perspective is limited. The risk focus is paradoxical as clients purchase adventure experiences involving risk and uncertainty, whereas tour operators must minimize the risk and emphasize safety. Additionally, adventure tourism can also take place in urban or man-made environments. Furthermore, the traditional definitions mostly ignore the lived experience of the adventure consumer. Individuals undertake adventure for a variety of reasons, including risk and thrills, health and well-being, connection to others and nature, recreational mastery, and personal development. We propose a nuanced conceptual understanding of adventure tourism within an ecological dynamics perspective that considers the relationship between the person, the adventure activity and the surrounding environment, and the recognition of affordances that support well-being. This theoretical approach provides a useful framework for operators and researchers that encourages a more personalized and meaningful experience for the tourist.

Key words: Affordances; Ecological dynamics; Effectivities; Adventure tourism; Relationships

Address correspondence to Dr. Eric Brymer, Carnegie School of Sport, Leeds Beckett University, Fairfax 204, Headingley Campus, Leeds, LS6 3QS. Tel: 0113 81 23528; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Review International, Vol. 21, pp. 317-329
1544-2721/17 $60.00 + .00
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3727/154427217X
15022104437765
E-ISSN 1943-4421
Copyright © 2017 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Tourist Photographs and Destination Imagery on Social Media: Reading The Stellenbosch Winelands Through a Tourist Lens1

Louise A. Bordelon and Sanette L. A. Ferreira

Department of Geography and Environmental Studies, Stellenbosch University, Stellenbosch, South Africa

Tourists tend to visit the same places as other tourists where they focus their activity and spending on recognized iconic landscapes. This study analyzed user-generated images of the Stellenbosch winelands found on two social media platforms, namely Flickr and Instagram, and compared the images with promotional material of the same area. The research covered image locations, user origins, as well as the content and genre of the photographic representations. The research methods were detailed cataloguing, mapping, and analyses of over 1,500 photographic images found on Flickr and Instagram. To gain an understanding of the destination imagery used by the Stellenbosch winelands marketing fraternity, interviews were conducted with relevant stakeholders to garner information about supply-side perceptions and marketing strategies. Results show that certain elements of the tourist experience are overlooked and a number of opportunities exist for destination marketers to create a more inclusive Stellenbosch winelands experience.

Key words: Destination imagery; Flickr; Instagram; Representation; South Africa; Stellenbosch; Tourist gaze

1This article was originally intended as part of the Special Section, Part 2 on Research in Africa, edited by Christian M. Rogerson and Gijsbert Hoogendoorn, that was inadvertently omitted from the previous issue.
Address correspondence to Dr. Louise A. Bordelon, Department of Geography and Environmental Studies, Stellenbosch University, Private Bag X1, Matieland 7602, Stellenbosch 7600, South Africa. Tel: +27.21.8083105; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it