Journal of Gastronomy 2(4) Abstracts

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Journal of Gastronomy and Tourism, Vol. 2, pp. 217-231
2169-2971/17 $60.00 + .00
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3727/216929717X
15046207899375
E-ISSN 2169-298X
Copyright © 2017 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

In Search of Nordicity: How New Nordic Cuisine Shaped Destination Branding in Copenhagen

Can-Seng Ooi* and Jesper Strandgaard Pedersen†

*School of Social Sciences, University of Tasmania, Tasmania, Australia
†Department of Organization, Copenhagen Business School (CBS), Frederiksberg, Denmark

This article looks at the branding of Copenhagen as a food destination through the advent of the New Nordic Cuisine movement and how this may change the way we think about destination branding. The destination management organization of Copenhagen opportunistically embraced the New Nordic Cuisine concept, which then posed several destination branding challenges. The first challenge is that a destination brand should accentuate the authenticity and uniqueness of the locality to distinguish the destination from competition. Branding a destination as part of a region, in this case “New Nordic Cuisine,” questions the brand’s usefulness in relation to the branding of a specific city. The second challenge is concerned with the “local turn,” using local and seasonal produce as the main focus in branding the New Nordic Cuisine. This concept is neither new nor original and can be easily adapted for other places, thus questioning the “uniqueness” of the destination branding. The article addresses these challenges and shows, first, how a vague and ambiguous term like “Nordic” can be a focal point for local and international audiences; and second, that the brand message issue is not what is authentically or uniquely Danish but what others imagine an authentic and unique Denmark to be. The study points to an emergent and opportunistic, transterritorial strategy in destination branding built largely on accreditation and a global recognition that is vague and even inaccurate. The article reports findings from an inductive, in-depth, longitudinal study of the New Nordic Cuisine and its movement’s development in relation to branding Copenhagen as a tourism destination.

Key words: Destination branding; New Nordic Cuisine; Food tourism; Local turn; Transterritorial branding

Address correspondence to Jesper Strandgaard Pedersen, Department of Organization, Copenhagen Business School (CBS), Kilevej 14A, DK-2000 Frederiksberg, Denmark. Tel: (+45) 38152804; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Journal of Gastronomy and Tourism, Vol. 2, pp. 233-245
2169-2971/17 $60.00 + .00
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3727/216929717X
15046207899384
E-ISSN 2169-298X
Copyright © 2017 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Tourism and Terroir Products From Mountain Summer Farming Landscapes

Bolette Bele,* Hanne Sickel,* and Ann Norderhaug*†

*Norwegian Institute of Bioeconomy Research (NIBIO), As, Norway
KulturlandskapskonsulentNotteroy, Norway

Mountain tourism depends intensively on the quality of the landscape. In recent years, the Norwegian Trekking Association has focused on local food products at their staffed lodges and it uses the slogan “eat the view.” Such a strategy raises the focus on the agricultural use of the land and the quality of the products. Several Norwegian studies were carried out to investigate the quality of different mountain products and connections with vegetation types and grazing behavior. The results show that milk and meat products from animals grazing on alpine rangelands have improved quality compared to “normal” products. A healthier fatty acid composition and a higher content of secondary plant metabolites were characteristic of mountain products. Furthermore, grazing is of the utmost importance for the maintenance of open mountain landscapes and the biodiversity that is dependent on such landscapes. Maintaining traditional grazing systems also secures the preservation of traditional ecological knowledge about utilizing natural resources. Mountain tourism experiences could be improved and enhanced by documenting and telling the unique story of these complex connections between mountain landscapes, biodiversity, agricultural traditions, and local food products.

Key words: Local food quality; Sense of place; Storytelling; Traditional ecological knowledge (TEK)

Address correspondence to Bolette Bele, Norwegian Institute of Bioeconomy Research (NIBIO), PO Box 115, NO-1431 As, Norway. Tel: +4791195359; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Journal of Gastronomy and Tourism, Vol. 2, pp. 247-258
2169-2971/17 $60.00 + .00
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3727/216929717X
15046207899401
E-ISSN 2169-298X
Copyright © 2017 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Local Versus Imported Food: Opportunities and Constraints for Tanzanian Hotels

Halima Omari Mangi* and Justin Kalisti Urassa

*Department of Development Studies, College of Social Sciences and Humanities, Sokoine University of Agriculture, Morogoro, Tanzania
†Department of Policy, Planning and Management, College of Social Sciences and Humanities, Sokoine University of Agriculture, Morogoro, Tanzania

Developing countries are progressively experiencing economic growth through international tourism. Due to its unique characteristics, tourism is emerging as a potential opportunity for economic growth, earning of foreign exchange, and poverty reduction. The sale of goods and services to foreign tourists does not imply huge capital investments. Nevertheless, Tanzania’s tourism depends heavily on imported food. A cross-sectional study was conducted in Morogoro Municipality and the cities of Dar es Salaam and Arusha in order to examine major reasons for the use of imported food by hotels serving tourists with a focus on opportunities and constraints in relation to the supply of local foods. In addition, the study aimed to identify tourists’ food preferences. The study used both primary and secondary data. Results show that most of the food consumed in the hotels is locally sourced. Nonetheless, most of the food items are of foreign origin and, to a limited extent, food is supplied by local farmers and food producers. Imported food items included soft drinks, beverages, ingredients for hot drinks, and breakfast items. Poor quality of some locally available food, unreliability of supplies, lackof quality control systems, price fluctuations, insufficient packaging, and hygiene issues were major concerns that made most of the hoteliers avoid purchasing food items directly from local farmers. In view of this, it is recommended, among others, that the government and tourism stakeholders work with the farmers and suppliers to enhance awareness on food quality and hygienic handling of food items with a view of strengthening relationship between the sectors of agriculture and tourism for sustainable economic development.

Key words: Local food; Food import; Food quality; Tanzania

Address correspondence to Halima Omari Mangi, Department of Development Studies, College of Social Sciences and Humanities, Sokoine University of Agriculture, P. O. Box 3024, Morogoro, Tanzania. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Journal of Gastronomy and Tourism, Vol. 2, pp. 259-271
2169-2971/17 $60.00 + .00
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3727/216929717X
15046207899410
E-ISSN 2169-298X
Copyright © 2017 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

The Revenue Potential of Product Differentiation: Empirical Evidence From the Croatian Restaurant Industry

Bernd Frick,*† Olivier Gergaud,‡ and Petra Matic§

*Management Department, University of Paderborn, Paderborn, Germany
†Department of Sport Economics and Sport Management, Schloss Seeburg University, Seekirchen/Salzburg, Austria
‡KEDGE–Bordeaux Business School, Talence Cedex, France
§WGSN Group, Overath, Germany

The ultimate goal of strategic decision making in restaurants is to realize sustainable profits. To achieve this objective, managers must devise ways to create and capture value. Apart from actions to reduce production costs, to lower consumer transaction costs, or to introduce new products or services, the most promising strategy is to increase product demand by vertical and/or horizontal differentiation (i.e., by making the product sufficiently different from similar products offered by competitors). Using a large sample of restaurants from Croatia, a popular holiday destination in Southern Europe, this study shows that the adoption of either a “celebrity strategy” or a “wine strategy” is associated with significantly higher revenues and, eventually, higher profits. Because such strategies require substantial investment in either social or human capital both are difficult, if not impossible, to imitate, which fosters the search for differentiation.

Key words: Strategy; Differentiation; Competition; Restaurant performance

Address correspondence to Bernd Frick, Management Department, University of Paderborn, 33098 Paderborn, Germany. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Journal of Gastronomy and Tourism, Vol. 2, pp. 273-285
2169-2971/17 $60.00 + .00
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3727/216929717X
15046207899429
E-ISSN 2169-298X
Copyright © 2017 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Tourism as a Strategy for Redeployment in the Local Agri-Food Supply: The Case of Midi-Pyrénées

Jacinthe Bessière

Centre d’étude et de recherche Travail, OrganisationPouvoir, Centre of Studies and Research for Work, Organizations and Power (CERTOP), Institut Supérieur du Tourisme, de ’Hôtellerie et de l’Alimentation, Higher School of Tourism, Hospitality and Food Studies (ISTHIA), University of Toulouse Jean Jaurès, Toulouse, France

Contemporary agricultural production is subject to a new dynamics of heritage enhancement that involves exploiting its economic, social, and cultural resources. As part of a development strategy for rural areas and in response to a growing social demand, this process revitalizes agricultural and rural spaces by giving them new social, cultural, and touristic functions. French food heritage is a lever for tourism development, but it is also a marker of collective identity. The gastronomic experience associated with tourism crystallizes a range of expectations and representations, notably in rural areas, giving rise to changing practices, new offers, and modes of supply, often on the fringes of more institutionalized, less differentiated tourism development. If tourism can be seen as a potential springboard for innovation, promoting or consolidating regional food heritage enhancement initiatives, it also provides a space for redeployment by actors in the local agri-food supply. By focusing on tourism practices and representations, this article examines the impact of the quite considerable tourism market in Midi-Pyrénées on food heritage innovation and what ways eating provides a lever for redefining the local offer. The article highlights the plurality of local agri-food forms available to tourists, with countless different actors and interactions between tourists and stakeholders. Considerable variety in adaptive strategies is found, either predominantly conservative or radically innovative, or a more hybrid combination of the two.

Key words: Food heritage; Local actors; Innovation; France; Food supply chain

Address correspondence to Jacinthe Bessière, Associate Professor in Sociology, Centre d’étude et de recherche Travail, OrganisationPouvoir, Centre of Studies and Research for Work, Organizations and Power (CERTOP), CNRS-UMR 5044, Institut Supérieur du Tourisme, de l’Hôtellerie et de l’Alimentation, Higher School of Tourism, Hospitality and Food Studies (ISTHIA), University of Toulouse Jean Jaurès, 5, allées Antonio Machado, 31058 Toulouse cedex 09, France. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it