Tourism Review International 21(4) Abstracts

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Tourism Review International, Vol. 21, pp. 333-346
1544-2721/17 $60.00 + .00
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3727/154427217X
15094520591321
E-ISSN 1943-4421
Copyright © 2017 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Empowerment in Tourism: A Review of Peer-Reviewed Literature

Yeganeh Aghazamani and Carter A. Hunt

Department of Recreation, Park, and Tourism Management, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, USA

This article presents a review of the peer-reviewed scholarship that explores the relationship between tourism and empowerment. The concept of empowerment has attracted much interest from social scientists, and we begin by briefly synthesizing those perspectives. Our query of scholarly databases reveals 53 peer-reviewed articles that focus either conceptually or empirically on the topic of tourism-related empowerment. A thematic analysis of these writings revealed five main areas of focus: (1) issues related to local residents, (2) issues related to gender, (3) issues related to employees of tourism and hospitality firms, (4) issues related to disempowerment, and (5) issues related to tourists. We emphasize three main summary points about this literature. First, empowerment is typically assessed via single-shot case studies that focus on outcome rather process. Second, subjects of research on empowerment are not limited to local resident “hosts.” Third, although scholars have addressed a related notion of disempowerment, it is not clear whether this exists at the opposite end of a single empowerment continuum or if instead these are two distinct concepts, each occurring along a unique dimension. Finally, we build upon other social sciences and our synthesis of the tourism literature to offer a reconciliatory definition of empowerment as “a multidimensional, context-dependent, and dynamic process that provides humans, individually or collectively, with greater agency, freedom, and capacity to improve their quality of life as a function of engagement with the phenomenon of tourism.” We conclude by suggesting several opportunities for further empirical research on tourism-related empowerment.

Key words: Empowerment; Local residents; Communities; Gender; Tourism

Address correspondence to Yeganeh Aghazamani, Doctoral candidate, Department of Recreation, Park, and Tourism Management, The Pennsylvania State University, 817 Donald H. Ford Building, University Park, PA 16802, USA. Tel: 1-814-441-5523l; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Review International, Vol. 21, pp. 347-364
1544-2721/17 $60.00 + .00
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3727/154427217X
15094520591330
E-ISSN 1943-4421
Copyright © 2017 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Tapping the Chinese Market: An Examination of Chinese Tourists’ Images and Constraints Towards Cruising

Suiwen (Sharon) Zou* and James F. Petrick

*The U.S.-Asia Center for Tourism & Hospitality Research, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, USA
†Department of Recreation, Park and Tourism Sciences, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, USA

This study examined Chinese tourists’ images and constraints towards cruising, and their influences on cruising desires/intentions. Both qualitative and quantitative methodologies were utilized. Based on an extensive literature review, semistructured interviews were conducted to determine measurement items for constructs of interest. Quantitative data were then collected in order to examine the proposed hypotheses. An innovative procedure for developing the best items to be included in the scales was utilized. The results revealed that: 1) images were antecedents of desires and intentions; 2) negative cognitive images have a strong influence on constraints; and 3) constraints were found to have no significant influence on intentions. Both theoretical and practical implications are suggested.

Key words: Destination images; Travel constraints; Travel intentions; Cruise tourism; Chinese tourists

Address correspondence to Suiwen (Sharon) Zou, Postdoctoral Fellow, The U.S.-Asia Center for Tourism & Hospitality Research, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA 19122, USA. Tel: +01 2023511215; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Review International, Vol. 21, pp. 365-378
1544-2721/17 $60.00 + .00
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3727/154427217X
15094520591349
E-ISSN 1943-4421
Copyright © 2017 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Approaching the Adoption of Lean Thinking Principles in Food Operations in Hotels in Egypt

Abuelkassem A. A. Mohammad

Hotel Management Department, Faculty of Tourism and Hotels, Minia University, Minia, Egypt

Lean thinking is a quality management approach that aims to eliminate waste and provide value for customers. It was originated and successfully applied in the manufacturing business and then transferred to the services industry. This study aimed to investigate the implementation of lean thinking in food and beverage operations in hotels in Egypt. A qualitative approach was adopted in this study using semistructured interview as a tool for gathering primary data. The sample of this study included 19 participants who were experienced in the field of quality and food and beverage operations. The results of the study revealed that the largest share of hotels in Egypt did not adopt lean thinking principles in their food and beverage operations. There were some obstacles that have limited the adoption of lean thinking in hotel food operations (e.g., lack of motivations for hotels; additional work effort and expenses associated with applying new approach). The results also showed that applying lean thinking principles in hotel food operations can achieve many operational benefits, such as reducing operating costs by eliminating wastes and achieving customer satisfaction through providing added value. The study has provided some practical implications, in a form of proposed model, that would enable a successful implementation of lean thinking in food and beverage operations in hotels.

Key words: Lean thinking; Lean service; Food and beverage operations; Hotels; Egypt

Address correspondence to Dr. Abuelkassem A. A. Mohammad, Hotel Management Department, Faculty of Tourism and Hotels, Minia University, University post office: 61519, Minia, Egypt. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Review International, Vol. 21, pp. 379-393
1544-2721/17 $60.00 + .00
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3727/154427217X
15094520591358
E-ISSN 1943-4421
Copyright © 2017 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

The Interaction of Tourism and Cyclone Activity in East Asia: Sustainability and Disasters

Tam Bang Vu, Eric Iksoon Im,1 Roy R. Thompson, and Tom DeWitt

College of Business and Economics, University of Hawaii at Hilo, Hilo, HI, USA

This research investigated the relationship between cyclone activity and tourism in the Northeast Asian and Southeast Asian regions. A dataset on the damage impact of cyclones was constructed based on the Tropical Cyclone Best Track tables and the Annual Tropical Cyclone Reports provided by the United States National Climatic Data Center for the period 1995–2014. A damage index was based on the wind speed when each cyclone went through a region and the distance of the region to the largest city in the vicinity. The results showed that there were feedback effects between these cyclones and unsustainable tourism where cyclone damage reduced the number of tourist arrivals and some unsustainable activities by the tourism industry increased the cyclone damage. We then examined the disparities among the affected countries in East Asia. The results showed that that except for Philippines, which endured much more cyclone damage than that aggregate level, the other countries were either at or below the average level of damage.

Key words: Northeast Asia; Southeast Asia; Cyclone damage; Sustainability; Two-way causality

1Published posthumously.
Address correspondence to Tam Bang Vu, College of Business and Economics, University of Hawaii-Hilo, 200 W. Kawili Street, Hilo, HI 96720, USA. Tel: 808-932-7485; Fax: 808-932-7273; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Review International, Vol. 21, pp. 395-405
1544-2721/17 $60.00 + .00
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3727/154427217X
15094520591367
E-ISSN 1943-4421
Copyright © 2017 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

The Relative Influence of Travel Favorability and Importance on Travel Behavior

Chun-Chu Chen

Department of Movement Sciences, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID, USA

Tourism
scholars have applied the concept of attitude to examine a variety of topics related to tourism behaviors. Unfortunately, these studies have focused primarily on a respondent’s favorability toward travel at the exclusion of at least on other potentially important predictor. Specifically, this research proposes that the concept of travel importance, defined as the degree of priority a person attaches to travel, is a relevant variable that should be included in the analysis of travel behaviors. Based on results from a US sample (n = 559), the hypothesis is confirmed. It is also found that people who perceive travel as more important to their life are more likely to actively and passively search for information about future travel plans, resulting in more frequent travel. The article concludes with recommendations for marketing tourism products and destinations.

Key words: Attitude; Travel importance; Travel behavior; Travel information search; Travel knowledge

Address correspondence to Chun-Chu Chen, Department of Movement Sciences, University of Idaho, 875 Perimeter Drive MS 2401, Moscow, ID 83844, USA. Tel: 208-885-7921; Fax: 208-885-5929; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Review International, Vol. 21, pp. 407-415
1544-2721/17 $60.00 + .00
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3727/154427217X
15097411867459
E-ISSN 1943-4421
Copyright © 2017 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

An Essay on the Touristic Representations of India Presented in Three Postcolonial Travelogues

Archana Parashar,* Mukesh Kumar,† and Vineeta Saluja

*Business Communication, Indian Institute of Management Raipur, Sejbahar, Raipur, Chhattisgarh, India
†Business Communication, Indian Institute of Management Amritsar, Amritsar, Punjab, India
‡Indian Institute of Information Technology Design and Manufacturing Jabalpur, Jabalpur, Madhya Pradesh, India

This article analyzes the perceptions of postcolonial writers who visit India as tourists and project their vision about people, culture, and region in India in their respective travelogues. As a postcolonial discourse, studies of tourism in countries like India have great concerns over identity and representation. This discourse over culture, political and economic nature has implications for tourism encounters. The three travelogues chosen for the analysis are Sarah MacDonald’s Holy Cow: An Indian AdventureAnees Jung’s Unveiling India: A Woman’s Journey, and V. S. Naipaul’s An Area of Darkness. The article also argues for the postcolonial theory of Graham Huggan, which maintains that postcolonial discourses are marketed and domesticated for Western consumption. Thus, for these writers, India becomes a fictional construct and a sum of the tourist attractions it lays out through a chronological sequence of events. The article reflects important cues on the cultural patterns of globalization and, at the same time, openly reflects on the changing attitudes and perceptions of travel writers as tourists. The study also contributes to the existing literature by making a comparative assessment of these touristic projections.

Key words: Anees Jung; V. S. Naipaul; Sarah McDonald; Graham Huggan; Tourists; Postcolonial discourse; Travelogues

Address correspondence to Dr. Archana Parashar, Assistant Professor, Business Communication, Indian Institute of Management Raipur, GEC Campus, Sejbahar, Raipur, Chhatisgarh, India 492015. Tel: +91-9827789442; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it  or This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Review International, Vol. 21, pp. 417-430
1544-2721/17 $60.00 + .00
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3727/154427217X
14912408849430
E-ISSN 1943-4421
Copyright © 2017 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Resident Attitudes Toward Future Tourism Development: “It’s a Question of Trust”

David A. Cardenas, Fang Meng, Simon Hudson, and Karen Thal

School of Hotel, Restaurant and Tourism Management, The University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, USA

Extensive research has examined resident attitudes toward local tourism development, yet many gaps still remain. The most prominent framework used to examine resident attitudes is social exchange theory (SET), with trust being one of its main constructs. This study expands on previous research about resident attitudes by examining the antecedent of trust—trustworthiness (ability, benevolence, and integrity)—as it relates to future tourism development. Residents in a small town in the southeastern US were surveyed to determine their level of trustworthiness with the local Chamber of Commerce, which was proposing the development of a new international horse park. Principle component analysis, correlation analysis, and regression analysis were conducted. Analysis of the data indicates that trustworthiness is a unidimensional structure and positively predicts resident support.

Key words: Resident attitudes; Trust; Trustworthiness; Perceived impacts

Address correspondence to David A. Cardenas, School of Hotel, Restaurant and Tourism Management, The University of South Carolina, Carolina Coliseum, Room 1011-B, Columbia, SC 29208, USA. Tel: 803-777-5120; Fax: 803-777-6427; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it